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Making the most of a meal
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A Butterfly's New Green Glow
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Firefly Delight
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Memory by Hypnosis
Meet your mysterious relative
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A Light Delay
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A New Basketball Gets Slick
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Small but WISE
It's a Small E-mail World After All
The solar system's biggest junkyard
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A Rainforest Trapped in Amber
Message in a dinosaur's teeth
Mammals in the Shadow of Dinosaurs
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Rodent Rubbish as an Ice-Age Thermometer
Island of Hope
Meteorites may have sparked life on Earth
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An Ocean View's Downside
Easy Ways to Conserve Water
Watching for Wildfires in Yellowstone
Finding the Past
Stone Age Sole Survivors
A Plankhouse Past
Settling the Americas
Fish
Parrotfish
Skates and Rays
Pygmy Sharks
Food and Nutrition
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. Whom
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Problems with Prepositions
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Mathematics
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
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Math of the World
Human Body
What the appendix is good for
Smiles Turn Away Colds
Surviving Olympic Heat
Invertebrates
Corals
Oysters
Crawfish
Mammals
Vampire Bats
Chipmunks
Asian Elephants
Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Children and Media
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Physics
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Dreams of Floating in Space
Electric Backpack
Plants
Stalking Plants by Scent
Fungus Hunt
White fuzzy mold not as friendly as it looks
Reptiles
Black Mamba
Caimans
Box Turtles
Space and Astronomy
Cool as a Jupiter
Evidence of a Wet Mars
Black Holes That Burp
Technology and Engineering
A Micro-Dose of Your Own Medicine
Reach for the Sky
Algae Motors
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
What is a Noun
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Revving Up Green Machines
Reach for the Sky
Weather
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Either Martians or Mars has gas
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Zooming In on the Wild Sun

When you watch the sun set, it looks like a smooth, orange circle sinking below the horizon. But the sun turns out to be a much wilder place when you take a closer look. The sun's surface is covered with massive, bumpy structures called granules. Made of incredibly hot gas, each granule is the size of Texas and lasts for about 6 to 10 minutes. The granules are always changing shape, disappearing, and reappearing on the sun's chaotic surface. Using a special telescope for looking at the sun, scientists have now taken the most detailed pictures of these granules so far. The pictures show that the granules are covered with canyons and plateaus: billions of giant Grand Canyons with walls up to 100 kilometers tall. The sun goes through a pattern of changes every 11 years, including a period when it is covered with dark patches called sunspots. You might think the sun would be a little dimmer during this phase—but instead, it gets brighter. Scientists know this is because of very bright structures, called faculae, found among the granules. Faculae is Latin for "little torches." Most scientists think the faculae are big tubes sunken into the sun's surface, like a rabbit's burrows. But in the new images, the faculae look like enormous walls. The more scientists learn about these faculae and other structures on the sun’s surface, the better they will understand how the sun's brightness changes over the years. This is important because even tiny changes in brightness might affect Earth's climate. Our wild sun may be modifying temperatures on our planet just enough to give us a few centuries worth of cooler or warmer weather.—S. McDonagh Caution: Never look at the sun directly. Permanent eye damage can also result from looking at the disk of the sun through a camera viewfinder, with binoculars, or with a telescope.

Zooming In on the Wild Sun
Zooming In on the Wild Sun








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