Agriculture
Flush-Free Fertilizer
Keeping Bugs Away from Food
Middle school science adventures
Amphibians
Toads
Newts
Bullfrogs
Animals
Lucky Survival for Black Cats
Chicken Talk
Killer Flatworms Hunt with Poison
Behavior
Giving Sharks Safe Homes
Pain Expectations
Lightening Your Mood
Birds
Birds We Eat
Backyard Birds
Seagulls
Chemistry and Materials
Getting the dirt on carbon
Sweeeet! The Skinny on Sugar Substitutes
Music of the Future
Computers
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Look into My Eyes
Two monkeys see a more colorful world
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dinosaur Eggs-citement
Three strikes wiped out woolly mammoths
Tiny Pterodactyl
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Wave of Destruction
Shrinking Glaciers
Environment
Shrimpy Invaders
Fishing for Fun Takes Toll
A Stormy History
Finding the Past
Chicken of the Sea
Early Maya Writing
A Volcano's Deadly Ash
Fish
Whale Sharks
Megamouth Sharks
Tuna
Food and Nutrition
Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
Yummy bugs
Packing Fat
GSAT English Rules
Pronouns
Subject and Verb Agreement
Who vs. Whom
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Scholarship
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
Math is a real brain bender
Human Body
Sleeping Soundly for a Longer Life
Hey batter, wake up!
Gut Microbes and Weight
Invertebrates
Jellyfish
Shrimps
Flies
Mammals
Dachshunds
Sea Lions
Orangutans
Parents
How children learn
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Children and Media
Physics
Black Hole Journey
One ring around them all
Dreams of Floating in Space
Plants
White fuzzy mold not as friendly as it looks
Bright Blooms That Glow
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Reptiles
Rattlesnakes
Gila Monsters
Box Turtles
Space and Astronomy
A Planet from the Early Universe
Witnessing a Rare Venus Eclipse
Pluto, plutoid: What's in a name?
Technology and Engineering
Model Plane Flies the Atlantic
Reach for the Sky
Algae Motors
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Problems with Prepositions
Transportation
Revving Up Green Machines
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Robots on the Road, Again
Weather
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Recipe for a Hurricane
Add your Article

Yaks

The yak (Bos grunniens) is a long-haired humped domestic bovine found in Tibet and throughout the Himalayan region of south central Asia, as well as in Mongolia. In Tibetan, the word yak refers only to the male of the species; a female is a dri or nak. In most languages which borrowed the word, including English, however, yak is usually used for both sexes. A Real Yak: Wild yaks (subspecies B. g. mutus) stand about two meters tall at the shoulder and weigh 1,000 kg (2,200 lb). They usually form groups of between 10 and 30 animals. Domestic yaks are about half that height, usually weighing over 1200 pounds with a lifespan of 20-25 years. Both types have long shaggy hair to insulate them from the cold. Wild yaks can be either brown or black. Domesticated ones can also be white. Both males and females have horns. The word Yak is also used to describe an irritating or disagreeable individual. A Nice Breeze: Wild yaks inhabit treeless uplands like hills, mountains and plateaux between 3,200 m (10,500 ft) and roughly 5,400 m (18,000 ft). They eat grasses, lichens and other plants. During the warmest season these hardy animals live in areas of permanent snow and move lower down at colder times. They are insulated by dense, close, matted under-hair as well as their shaggy outer hair. Beasts of Burden: Domesticated yaks are kept primarily for their milk, fiber, and meat; they are also used as beasts of burden, transporting goods across mountain passes for local farmers and traders as well as in support of climbing and trekking expeditions. Yak milk is often processed to a cheese called chhurpi in Tibetan and Nepali languages, and byaslag in Mongolia. Often the pack animals are actually crossbreeds of the yak and Bos taurus (common domestic cattle). These are known in Tibetan as dzo or dzopkyo. Sewing Machines: Yak fiber is soft and smooth, in several colors, including shades of gray, brown, black and white. The length of yak fiber is about 1.2 inches. It is combed or shed from the yak and then dehaired. The result is a splendid downy fiber that can be spun into yarn for knitting. Unlike cattle, yaks grunt rather than moo. Many wild yaks are killed for food by the Tibetans; they are now an endangered species. More recently, sports involving domesticated yaks, such as yak skiing or yak polo, are being marketed as tourist attractions in Central Asian countries.

Yaks
Yaks








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™