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Growing Healthier Tomato Plants
Silk’s superpowers
Got Milk? How?
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No Fair: Monkey Sees, Doesn't
How to Silence a Cricket
Return of the Lost Limbs
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The Disappearing Newspaper
How Much Babies Know
The Other Side of the Zoo Fence
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Nightingales
Pheasants
Swifts
Chemistry and Materials
A Diamond Polish for Ancient Tools
Cold, colder and coldest ice
Salt secrets
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It's a Small E-mail World After All
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Supersonic Splash
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Big Fish in Ancient Waters
Teeny Skull Reveals Ancient Ancestor
Ancient Critter Caught Shedding Its Skin
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Weird, new ant
Explorer of the Extreme Deep
Farms sprout in cities
Environment
Eating Up Foul Sewage Smells
The Oily Gulf
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Finding the Past
Oldest Writing in the New World
A Long Haul
Stonehenge Settlement
Fish
Carp
Swordfish
Pygmy Sharks
Food and Nutrition
A Taste for Cheese
Recipe for Health
Sponges' secret weapon
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. That vs. Which
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Tarrant High overcoming the odds
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Human Body
Prime Time for Broken Bones
Opening a Channel for Tasting Salt
Nature's Medicines
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Sponges
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Moles
Flying Foxes
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What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Physics
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
One ring around them all
Plants
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
A Giant Flower's New Family
When Fungi and Algae Marry
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Caimans
Alligators
Anacondas
Space and Astronomy
World of Three Suns
Evidence of a Wet Mars
No Fat Stars
Technology and Engineering
Dancing with Robots
Musclebots Take Some Steps
Young Scientists Take Flight
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
Pronouns
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Charged cars that would charge
Where rivers run uphill
Weather
The solar system's biggest junkyard
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Watering the Air
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Worms

A worm is an elongated soft-bodied invertebrate animal. The best-known is the earthworm, a member of phylum Annelida, but there are hundreds of thousands of different species that live in a wide variety of habitats other than soil. Originally the word referred to any creeping or a crawling animal of any kind or size, such as a serpent, caterpillar, snail, or the like (this old usage is preserved in the name "slow worm", actually a lizard). Later this definition was narrowed to the modern definition which still includes several different animal groups. Other invertebrate groups may be called worms, especially colloquially. Many insect larvae are called worms, such as the railroad worm, woodworm, glowworm, or bloodworms. Worms may also be called helminths, especially in medical or terminology when referring to parasitic worms, especially the Nematoda (roundworms) and Cestoda (tapeworms). Hence helminthology is the study of parasitic worms. When an animal, such as a dog, is said to have worms, it means that the dog is infested with parasitic worms, typically roundworm or tapeworm. Worm species differ in their abilities to move about on their own. Many species have bodies with no major muscles, and cannot move on their own. They must be moved by forces or other animals in their environment. Many species have bodies with major muscles, that let them move on their own. They are a type of muscular hydrostat. The fear of worms is known as 'scoleciphobia'.

Worms
Worms








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