Agriculture
Middle school science adventures
Microbes at the Gas Pump
Got Milk? How?
Amphibians
Newts
Salamanders
Bullfrogs
Animals
A Spider's Taste for Blood
Big Squid
Thieves of a Feather
Behavior
Brainy bees know two from three
The Science Fair Circuit
Pollution at the ends of the Earth
Birds
Hawks
Lovebirds
Nightingales
Chemistry and Materials
Music of the Future
Smelly Traps for Lampreys
Getting the dirt on carbon
Computers
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Graphene's superstrength
Look into My Eyes
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dino-Dining Dinosaurs
Dino Takeout for Mammals
Tiny Pterodactyl
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Island of Hope
Watering the Air
Life under Ice
Environment
The Down Side of Keeping Clean
Bald Eagles Forever
Alien Invasions
Finding the Past
Big Woman of the Distant Past
A Big Discovery about Little People
Untangling Human Origins
Fish
White Tip Sharks
Swordfish
Lampreys
Food and Nutrition
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
Sponges' secret weapon
GSAT English Rules
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Pronouns
Order of Adjectives
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Mathematics
Setting a Prime Number Record
Losing with Heads or Tails
Play for Science
Human Body
Cell Phones and Possible Health Hazards
Don't Eat That Sandwich!
Attacking Asthma
Invertebrates
Worms
Mussels
Bedbugs
Mammals
Guinea Pigs
Hoofed Mammals
Black Bear
Parents
How children learn
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Physics
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Powering Ball Lightning
Plants
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
Making the most of a meal
Stalking Plants by Scent
Reptiles
Lizards
Asp
Reptiles
Space and Astronomy
Slip-sliding away
Tossing Out a Black Hole Life Preserver
Mercury's magnetic twisters
Technology and Engineering
Young Scientists Take Flight
A Light Delay
Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
Pronouns
What is a Noun
Transportation
Revving Up Green Machines
Charged cars that would charge
Where rivers run uphill
Weather
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
A Dire Shortage of Water
Where rivers run uphill
Add your Article

World’s largest lizard is venomous too

If you’re looking for a new pet, don’t even think about a Komodo dragon. These reptiles are the world’s largest lizards and can grow to be 10 feet long and weigh more than 300 pounds. (Roughly the weight of two or three eighth-graders.) Komodo dragons run fast and eat almost any kind of meat, including dead animals, other Komodo dragons and people who get too close. “These things are incredible killing machines,” says Bryan Fry, a biologist and expert on animal venom. If those reasons aren’t good enough, consider the bite of a Komodo dragon. According to a new study, it may kill prey like snakes by injecting venom. This chemical, according to Fry and his team of scientists at the University of Melbourne in Australia, can cause shock in the unlucky victim. A person or animal goes into shock when the body cannot deliver enough blood to the organs to keep functioning. As a result, the body starts to shut down. Scientists have only recently begun to understand why a Komodo dragon is so lethal. Some people used to believe that a Komodo dragon’s bite contained bacteria from the mouth that would cause a severe infection in the victim’s blood. The infection would eventually kill the animal, but it could take days. Until then, the Komodo dragon would follow the wounded animal. Fry calls that story a fairy tale. He says that after being bitten by a Komodo dragon, animals usually die quickly. “No one’s actually seen a Komodo dragon track a prey for three days until it dies,” he says. Plus, he says the Komodo dragon’s mouth doesn’t contain more bacteria than other animals in the wild. To study the giant lizards, Fry and his team used a tool called an MRI, which is often used to study diseases in human beings. MRI stands for magnetic resonance imaging. During the MRI procedure, the head of a Komodo dragon was placed in a powerful magnetic field. The magnetic field caused tiny vibrations in the atoms inside the lizard’s head, and the vibrations allowed Fry and his team to take three-dimensional pictures. These pictures showed that the lizard has six venom glands on each side of the lower jaw. Combined, these glands can hold about 1.2 milliliters of venom. “It’s astounding,” Fry says. “It was just jaw dropping when we got the first MRI results.” After more studies, Fry and his team found that the Komodo dragon venom contained some of the same ingredients as snake venom. These ingredients thin the blood and cause blood vessels to become larger — a recipe for shock. To test the venom, the scientists injected rats with it and observed that the rats became still. Fry’s work shows that Komodo dragons kill their prey with venom, and not by germs — and gives us another reason to steer clear of these giant lizards. That should be easy to do, since they live only on a few islands in the tropical country of Indonesia. Power words: (from the Yahoo! Kids Dictionary and Britannica.com) Venom: A poisonous secretion of an animal, such as a snake, spider or scorpion, usually transmitted by a bite or sting. shock: A potentially fatal physiological reaction to a variety of conditions, including illness, injury, hemorrhage and dehydration, usually characterized by marked loss of blood pressure, diminished blood circulation and inadequate blood flow to the tissues. MRI: (magnetic resonance imaging) Three-dimensional imaging technique used to visualize organs and structures inside the body without the need for X-rays or other radiation.

World’s largest lizard is venomous too
World’s largest lizard is venomous too








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™