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Making the most of a meal
Got Milk? How?
Treating peanut allergy bit by bit
Amphibians
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Poison Dart Frogs
Salamanders and Newts
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Killer Flatworms Hunt with Poison
How to Fly Like a Bat
Helping the Cause of Macaws
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Babies Prove Sound Learners
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Flower family knows its roots
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Scientist Profile: Wally Gilbert
Smelly Traps for Lampreys
Picture the Smell
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The Shape of the Internet
Fingerprint Evidence
A Classroom of the Mind
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Ancient Critter Caught Shedding Its Skin
A Dino King's Ancestor
Digging for Ancient DNA
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Ancient Heights
Greener Diet
A Global Warming Flap
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The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
A 'Book' on Every Living Thing
Groundwater and the Water Cycle
Finding the Past
A Human Migration Fueled by Dung?
Ancient Cave Behavior
Childhood's Long History
Fish
Saltwater Fish
Sting Ray
Halibut
Food and Nutrition
Food for Life
Yummy bugs
Building a Food Pyramid
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. That vs. Which
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Problems with Prepositions
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics
Play for Science
It's a Math World for Animals
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Human Body
Spit Power
Gut Germs to the Rescue
Opening a Channel for Tasting Salt
Invertebrates
Daddy Long Legs
Bedbugs
Squid
Mammals
African Hippopotamus
African Zebra
Wolves
Parents
Children and Media
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
How children learn
Physics
Speedy stars
Black Hole Journey
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Plants
City Trees Beat Country Trees
White fuzzy mold not as friendly as it looks
Nature's Alphabet
Reptiles
Tortoises
Reptiles
Pythons
Space and Astronomy
A Galaxy Far, Far, Far Away
An Earthlike Planet
Unveiling Titan
Technology and Engineering
A Satellite of Your Own
Beyond Bar Codes
Drawing Energy out of Wastewater
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
Problems with Prepositions
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Where rivers run uphill
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Weather
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Either Martians or Mars has gas
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Witnessing a Rare Venus Eclipse

Planet-watchers, take note. A rare event is coming to the sky next week. On Tuesday, June 8, Venus will cross in front of the sun for the first time since 1882, as seen from Earth. But don't try to watch it with your unprotected eyes. Staring at the sun can cause serious damage. If you have access to the right kind of equipment, though, and you're in the right place at the right time, the planet will look like a black dot drifting across the sun's surface. The event, called a transit, will last about 6 hours. In the eastern United States, people will be able to see only the last 90 minutes of the event. Europe will be a much better place to witness this momentous occasion. Better yet, anyone can watch it happen on the Internet. The transit will begin at about 12:30 a.m. Eastern Daylight Time (EDT) and end at about 6:30 a.m. EDT. From 12 a.m. to 7 a.m. EDT, the Norwegian Astronomical Association will Webcast the event from a few places in Norway at www.astronomy.no/. You can also go to the Web site www.exploratorium.edu/venus/ (Exploratorium). From 1 a.m. EDT to 7 a.m. EDT, a crew from the Exploratorium science museum in San Francisco will send images from Greece. If you live in a place where the transit will be visible, you can try watching it by allowing sunlight to shine through a pinhole onto a piece of paper. Look down at the paper, not up at the sky, to watch Venus cross the sun's face. It's worth finding some way to experience the event. Venus will cross in front of the sun only one more time this century—in the year 2012.—E. Sohn

Witnessing a Rare Venus Eclipse
Witnessing a Rare Venus Eclipse








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