Agriculture
Growing Healthier Tomato Plants
Watering the Air
Got Milk? How?
Amphibians
Bullfrogs
Poison Dart Frogs
Tree Frogs
Animals
A Microbe Nanny for Young Wasps
Sea Giants and Island Pygmies
Walks on the Wild Side
Behavior
Diving, Rolling, and Floating, Alligator Style
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Baby Talk
Birds
Rheas
Roadrunners
Penguins
Chemistry and Materials
A Framework for Growing Bone
The hottest soup in New York
Batteries built by Viruses
Computers
Small but WISE
Hubble trouble doubled
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Hunting by Sucking, Long Ago
Did Dinosaurs Do Handstands?
Supersight for a Dino King
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
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Earth
Quick Quake Alerts
Earth's Poles in Peril
Distant Quake Changes Geyser Eruptions
Environment
Giant snakes invading North America
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
An Ocean View's Downside
Finding the Past
Unearthing Ancient Astronomy
Ancient Cave Behavior
Oldest Writing in the New World
Fish
Trout
Tuna
Manta Rays
Food and Nutrition
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
Chocolate Rules
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Problems with Prepositions
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GSAT Mathematics
Setting a Prime Number Record
Play for Science
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Human Body
Heart Revival
A Better Flu Shot
Heavy Sleep
Invertebrates
Bedbugs
Butterflies
Praying Mantis
Mammals
Manxes
Beagles
Armadillo
Parents
How children learn
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
Powering Ball Lightning
Einstein's Skateboard
Strange Universe: The Stuff of Darkness
Plants
Plants Travel Wind Highways
Fast-flying fungal spores
The algae invasion
Reptiles
Asp
Rattlesnakes
Iguanas
Space and Astronomy
Sounds of Titan
Planning for Mars
Pluto, plutoid: What's in a name?
Technology and Engineering
Bionic Bacteria
Model Plane Flies the Atlantic
Machine Copy
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Middle school science adventures
How to Fly Like a Bat
Flying the Hyper Skies
Weather
Where rivers run uphill
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Arctic Melt
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Witnessing a Rare Venus Eclipse

Planet-watchers, take note. A rare event is coming to the sky next week. On Tuesday, June 8, Venus will cross in front of the sun for the first time since 1882, as seen from Earth. But don't try to watch it with your unprotected eyes. Staring at the sun can cause serious damage. If you have access to the right kind of equipment, though, and you're in the right place at the right time, the planet will look like a black dot drifting across the sun's surface. The event, called a transit, will last about 6 hours. In the eastern United States, people will be able to see only the last 90 minutes of the event. Europe will be a much better place to witness this momentous occasion. Better yet, anyone can watch it happen on the Internet. The transit will begin at about 12:30 a.m. Eastern Daylight Time (EDT) and end at about 6:30 a.m. EDT. From 12 a.m. to 7 a.m. EDT, the Norwegian Astronomical Association will Webcast the event from a few places in Norway at www.astronomy.no/. You can also go to the Web site www.exploratorium.edu/venus/ (Exploratorium). From 1 a.m. EDT to 7 a.m. EDT, a crew from the Exploratorium science museum in San Francisco will send images from Greece. If you live in a place where the transit will be visible, you can try watching it by allowing sunlight to shine through a pinhole onto a piece of paper. Look down at the paper, not up at the sky, to watch Venus cross the sun's face. It's worth finding some way to experience the event. Venus will cross in front of the sun only one more time this century—in the year 2012.—E. Sohn

Witnessing a Rare Venus Eclipse
Witnessing a Rare Venus Eclipse








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