Agriculture
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Treating peanut allergy bit by bit
Making the most of a meal
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Crocodile Hearts
Baboons Listen for Who's Tops
Living in the Desert
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Longer lives for wild elephants
Making Sense of Scents
Lightening Your Mood
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Chemistry and Materials
A Butterfly's Electric Glow
Small but WISE
The Incredible Shrunken Kids
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The hungry blob at the edge of the universe
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Mammals in the Shadow of Dinosaurs
Early Birds Ready to Rumble
The bug that may have killed a dinosaur
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Drilling Deep for Fuel
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Rocking the House
Environment
Saving Wetlands
A Vulture's Hidden Enemy
Shrimpy Invaders
Finding the Past
A Plankhouse Past
Of Lice and Old Clothes
Stone Tablet May Solve Maya Mystery
Fish
Megamouth Sharks
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Mako Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
Making good, brown fat
Chew for Health
GSAT English Rules
Capitalization Rules
Order of Adjectives
Pronouns
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Mathematics
Prime Time for Cicadas
Deep-space dancers
Math is a real brain bender
Human Body
Walking to Exercise the Brain
Sea Kids See Clearly Underwater
A Sour Taste in Your Mouth
Invertebrates
Camel Spiders
Jellyfish
Moths
Mammals
Sloth Bears
Moles
Lion
Parents
How children learn
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Strange Universe: The Stuff of Darkness
Powering Ball Lightning
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Plants
Farms sprout in cities
Sweet, Sticky Science
White fuzzy mold not as friendly as it looks
Reptiles
Boa Constrictors
Komodo Dragons
Sea Turtles
Space and Astronomy
Pluto, plutoid: What's in a name?
Roving the Red Planet
Witnessing a Rare Venus Eclipse
Technology and Engineering
Machine Copy
A Light Delay
Model Plane Flies the Atlantic
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
Pronouns
What is a Verb?
Transportation
How to Fly Like a Bat
Revving Up Green Machines
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Weather
A Dire Shortage of Water
A Change in Climate
Earth's Poles in Peril
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Witnessing a Rare Venus Eclipse

Planet-watchers, take note. A rare event is coming to the sky next week. On Tuesday, June 8, Venus will cross in front of the sun for the first time since 1882, as seen from Earth. But don't try to watch it with your unprotected eyes. Staring at the sun can cause serious damage. If you have access to the right kind of equipment, though, and you're in the right place at the right time, the planet will look like a black dot drifting across the sun's surface. The event, called a transit, will last about 6 hours. In the eastern United States, people will be able to see only the last 90 minutes of the event. Europe will be a much better place to witness this momentous occasion. Better yet, anyone can watch it happen on the Internet. The transit will begin at about 12:30 a.m. Eastern Daylight Time (EDT) and end at about 6:30 a.m. EDT. From 12 a.m. to 7 a.m. EDT, the Norwegian Astronomical Association will Webcast the event from a few places in Norway at www.astronomy.no/. You can also go to the Web site www.exploratorium.edu/venus/ (Exploratorium). From 1 a.m. EDT to 7 a.m. EDT, a crew from the Exploratorium science museum in San Francisco will send images from Greece. If you live in a place where the transit will be visible, you can try watching it by allowing sunlight to shine through a pinhole onto a piece of paper. Look down at the paper, not up at the sky, to watch Venus cross the sun's face. It's worth finding some way to experience the event. Venus will cross in front of the sun only one more time this century—in the year 2012.—E. Sohn

Witnessing a Rare Venus Eclipse
Witnessing a Rare Venus Eclipse








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