Agriculture
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Flush-Free Fertilizer
Growing Healthier Tomato Plants
Amphibians
Frogs and Toads
Tree Frogs
Salamanders
Animals
Insects Take a Breather
Living in the Desert
Little Bee Brains That Could
Behavior
Making light of sleep
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
The Science Fair Circuit
Birds
Cranes
Quails
Finches
Chemistry and Materials
Graphene's superstrength
Gooey Secrets of Mussel Power
Sticky Silky Feet
Computers
Earth from the inside out
Electronic Paper Turns a Page
Nonstop Robot
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Hunting by Sucking, Long Ago
Dinosaurs Grow Up
Meet your mysterious relative
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Petrified Lightning
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Distant Quake Changes Geyser Eruptions
Environment
Shrinking Fish
A 'Book' on Every Living Thing
A Change in Climate
Finding the Past
Untangling Human Origins
Salt and Early Civilization
Early Maya Writing
Fish
Puffer Fish
Whale Sharks
Nurse Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Eat Out, Eat Smart
Strong Bones for Life
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
GSAT English Rules
Adjectives and Adverbs
Who vs. Whom
Pronouns
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Detecting True Art
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Human Body
Disease Detectives
Fighting Off Micro-Invader Epidemics
Taking the sting out of scorpion venom
Invertebrates
Invertebrates
Oysters
Crustaceans
Mammals
Chipmunks
Giraffes
Guinea Pigs
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Children and Media
Physics
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
Powering Ball Lightning
Plants
Plants Travel Wind Highways
A Change in Leaf Color
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
Reptiles
Rattlesnakes
Black Mamba
Iguanas
Space and Astronomy
Ready, Set, Supernova
A Puffy Planetary Puzzle
Saturn's New Moons
Technology and Engineering
Young Scientists Take Flight
Searching for Alien Life
Riding Sunlight
The Parts of Speech
Problems with Prepositions
What is a Verb?
What is a Noun
Transportation
Robots on a Rocky Road
Robots on the Road, Again
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Weather
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Add your Article

Witnessing a Rare Venus Eclipse

Planet-watchers, take note. A rare event is coming to the sky next week. On Tuesday, June 8, Venus will cross in front of the sun for the first time since 1882, as seen from Earth. But don't try to watch it with your unprotected eyes. Staring at the sun can cause serious damage. If you have access to the right kind of equipment, though, and you're in the right place at the right time, the planet will look like a black dot drifting across the sun's surface. The event, called a transit, will last about 6 hours. In the eastern United States, people will be able to see only the last 90 minutes of the event. Europe will be a much better place to witness this momentous occasion. Better yet, anyone can watch it happen on the Internet. The transit will begin at about 12:30 a.m. Eastern Daylight Time (EDT) and end at about 6:30 a.m. EDT. From 12 a.m. to 7 a.m. EDT, the Norwegian Astronomical Association will Webcast the event from a few places in Norway at www.astronomy.no/. You can also go to the Web site www.exploratorium.edu/venus/ (Exploratorium). From 1 a.m. EDT to 7 a.m. EDT, a crew from the Exploratorium science museum in San Francisco will send images from Greece. If you live in a place where the transit will be visible, you can try watching it by allowing sunlight to shine through a pinhole onto a piece of paper. Look down at the paper, not up at the sky, to watch Venus cross the sun's face. It's worth finding some way to experience the event. Venus will cross in front of the sun only one more time this century—in the year 2012.—E. Sohn

Witnessing a Rare Venus Eclipse
Witnessing a Rare Venus Eclipse








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™