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Middle school science adventures
Seeds of the Future
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
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Salamanders and Newts
Poison Dart Frogs
Salamanders
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Little Bee Brains That Could
Living in the Desert
Pothole Repair, Insect-style
Behavior
The Disappearing Newspaper
Ear pain, weight gain
The nerve of one animal
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Kiwis
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Chemistry and Materials
Meteorites may have sparked life on Earth
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Hitting the redo button on evolution
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Two monkeys see a more colorful world
Play for Science
A Classroom of the Mind
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Ferocious Growth Spurts
Did Dinosaurs Do Handstands?
Hunting by Sucking, Long Ago
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Quick Quake Alerts
Earth's Lowly Rumble
Ice Age Melting and Rising Seas
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To Catch a Dragonfly
Shrimpy Invaders
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Finding the Past
Watching deep-space fireworks
Digging Up Stone Age Art
Sahara Cemetery
Fish
Perches
Pygmy Sharks
Catfish
Food and Nutrition
Packing Fat
Food for Life
Strong Bones for Life
GSAT English Rules
Order of Adjectives
Who vs. Whom
Problems with Prepositions
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
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GSAT Scholarship
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Mathematics
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Detecting True Art
Monkeys Count
Human Body
Heavy Sleep
Don't Eat That Sandwich!
A Better Flu Shot
Invertebrates
Crustaceans
Bees
Snails
Mammals
Gerbils
Platypus
Siamese Cats
Parents
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Invisibility Ring
Plants
Bright Blooms That Glow
Stalking Plants by Scent
The algae invasion
Reptiles
Box Turtles
Komodo Dragons
Chameleons
Space and Astronomy
A Planet's Slim-Fast Plan
Intruder Alert: Sweeping Space for Dust
Sounds of Titan
Technology and Engineering
Slip Sliming Away
Squeezing Oil from Old Wells
A Light Delay
The Parts of Speech
Problems with Prepositions
What is a Preposition?
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
How to Fly Like a Bat
Troubles with Hubble
Reach for the Sky
Weather
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Warmest Year on Record
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
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Witnessing a Rare Venus Eclipse

Planet-watchers, take note. A rare event is coming to the sky next week. On Tuesday, June 8, Venus will cross in front of the sun for the first time since 1882, as seen from Earth. But don't try to watch it with your unprotected eyes. Staring at the sun can cause serious damage. If you have access to the right kind of equipment, though, and you're in the right place at the right time, the planet will look like a black dot drifting across the sun's surface. The event, called a transit, will last about 6 hours. In the eastern United States, people will be able to see only the last 90 minutes of the event. Europe will be a much better place to witness this momentous occasion. Better yet, anyone can watch it happen on the Internet. The transit will begin at about 12:30 a.m. Eastern Daylight Time (EDT) and end at about 6:30 a.m. EDT. From 12 a.m. to 7 a.m. EDT, the Norwegian Astronomical Association will Webcast the event from a few places in Norway at www.astronomy.no/. You can also go to the Web site www.exploratorium.edu/venus/ (Exploratorium). From 1 a.m. EDT to 7 a.m. EDT, a crew from the Exploratorium science museum in San Francisco will send images from Greece. If you live in a place where the transit will be visible, you can try watching it by allowing sunlight to shine through a pinhole onto a piece of paper. Look down at the paper, not up at the sky, to watch Venus cross the sun's face. It's worth finding some way to experience the event. Venus will cross in front of the sun only one more time this century—in the year 2012.—E. Sohn

Witnessing a Rare Venus Eclipse
Witnessing a Rare Venus Eclipse








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