Agriculture
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Amphibians
Bullfrogs
Salamanders and Newts
Salamanders
Animals
Big Squid
Saving Africa's Wild Dogs
Sea Giants and Island Pygmies
Behavior
From dipping to fishing
Taking a Spill for Science
The case of the headless ant
Birds
Hawks
Backyard Birds
Falcons
Chemistry and Materials
A Framework for Growing Bone
Picture the Smell
Diamond Glow
Computers
Middle school science adventures
A Light Delay
Electronic Paper Turns a Page
Dinosaurs and Fossils
South America's sticky tar pits
Supersight for a Dino King
From Mammoth to Modern Elephant
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Flower family knows its roots
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Deep History
Environment
Fungus Hunt
Saving Wetlands
Toxic Cleanups Get a Microbe Boost
Finding the Past
Ancient Art on the Rocks
Words of the Distant Past
Prehistoric Trips to the Dentist
Fish
Tilapia
Manta Rays
Electric Ray
Food and Nutrition
Sponges' secret weapon
Eat Out, Eat Smart
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
GSAT English Rules
Order of Adjectives
Capitalization Rules
Problems with Prepositions
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT Exam Preparation
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
Mastering The GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
Losing with Heads or Tails
Detecting True Art
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Human Body
What the appendix is good for
A Long Haul
Football Scrapes and Nasty Infections
Invertebrates
Spiders
Daddy Long Legs
Worms
Mammals
Prairie Dogs
Orangutans
Cornish Rex
Parents
Children and Media
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Physics
Project Music
Invisibility Ring
Spin, Splat, and Scramble
Plants
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
White fuzzy mold not as friendly as it looks
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Reptiles
Gila Monsters
Iguanas
Sea Turtles
Space and Astronomy
A Dusty Birthplace
A Planet's Slim-Fast Plan
Tossing Out a Black Hole Life Preserver
Technology and Engineering
Crime Lab
Algae Motors
Slip Sliming Away
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Troubles with Hubble
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Weather
Watering the Air
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
A Change in Climate
Add your Article

Who's Knocking?

Is it, or isn't it? That's been the question on every bird-lover's lips since April, when scientists announced that the ivory-billed woodpecker is still alive (see "Glimpses of a Legendary Woodpecker"). For the past 60 years, many experts supposed that the bird was extinct. Even after the recent rediscovery, some have refused to believe the reports. Researchers from Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, placed digital sound recorders at more than 150 spots in the woodlands of Arkansas and left them there for weeks. In all, they collected about 18,000 hours of sound. Within the recordings, the Cornell scientists hear what they say could be the ivory-billed woodpecker's distinctive sharp calls, which sound like "kent." The recorders also picked up several dozen examples of a double-knocking sound, typical of the way an ivory-billed woodpecker is supposed to drum on a tree. On the lab's Web site (www.birds.cornell.edu/ivory/), the scientists have posted the new recordings, along with recordings from the 1930s. Computer analyses show that the recent calls are very similar to the 1930s sounds, which definitely come from ivory-billed woodpeckers. You can listen to the recordings, compare the sounds, and decide for yourself. Critics who challenged the first claims (which included seven sightings and 4 seconds of blurry video footage) have been more accepting of the new sound recordings. Still, doubts remain. The bird in the original video looks like a pileated, not ivory-billed, woodpecker to some people. Moreover, the sounds are not complete proof by themselves, the Cornell scientists say. Several people bird-watching in the Arkansas woods have said that blue jays there sometimes make an odd tooting sound. The recorded calls sound a little like them. To check this, the Cornell team plans to record blue jay calls in Arkansas. So far, there's no proof that will satisfy everyone. The only clincher, it seems, will be a clear, close-up photograph. Somebody still needs to take that picture.—E. Sohn

Who's Knocking?
Who's Knocking?








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™