Agriculture
Watering the Air
New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Amphibians
Toads
Bullfrogs
Tree Frogs
Animals
Fishy Sounds
A Tongue and a Half
Bee Heat Cooks Invaders
Behavior
Making Sense of Scents
Swedish Rhapsody
Night of the living ants
Birds
Kookaburras
Swans
Birds We Eat
Chemistry and Materials
Gooey Secrets of Mussel Power
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Big Machine Reveals Small Worlds
Computers
Galaxies far, far, far away
Hitting the redo button on evolution
New twists for phantom limbs
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Big Fish in Ancient Waters
A Rainforest Trapped in Amber
From Mammoth to Modern Elephant
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Getting the dirt on carbon
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Sky Dust Keeps Falling on Your Head
Environment
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
Catching Some Rays
Snow Traps
Finding the Past
Traces of Ancient Campfires
Of Lice and Old Clothes
A Plankhouse Past
Fish
White Tip Sharks
Goldfish
Whale Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Chocolate Rules
The mercury in that tuna
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
GSAT English Rules
Adjectives and Adverbs
Problems with Prepositions
Capitalization Rules
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
GSAT Scholarship
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Scholarship
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics
A Sweet Advance in Candy Packing
Deep-space dancers
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Human Body
Sea Kids See Clearly Underwater
Don't Eat That Sandwich!
Workouts: Does Stretching Help?
Invertebrates
Arachnids
Sponges
Fleas
Mammals
Gazelle
Beagles
Pekingese
Parents
Children and Media
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
One ring around them all
Dreams of Floating in Space
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Plants
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
A Change in Leaf Color
A Giant Flower's New Family
Reptiles
Geckos
Iguanas
Snakes
Space and Astronomy
Gravity Tractor as Asteroid Mover
A Star's Belt of Dust and Rocks
Tossing Out a Black Hole Life Preserver
Technology and Engineering
A Light Delay
Squeezing Oil from Old Wells
Model Plane Flies the Atlantic
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Verb?
What is a Noun
Transportation
Revving Up Green Machines
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Where rivers run uphill
Weather
Arctic Melt
Watering the Air
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Add your Article

White fuzzy mold not as friendly as it looks

When you think of things that are white and fuzzy, usually you think of something cute or nice. But a newly discovered fuzzy, white mold may be making bats in the Northeast U.S. sick. The illness and mold strike during hibernation, bats’ long wintertime sleep. The mold was first spotted by a cave explorer two years ago. The fuzzy fungus was growing on hibernating bats’ noses and wings. Bats with the mold often grew thin, weak and died. Scientists named this phenomenon “white-nose syndrome” after the mold found on the bats’ noses. Since that first sighting, thousands of bats in the Northeast have died. Scientists now wonder if the mystery fungus may be the killer. Once the mold hits caves or mines where bats are hibernating, between 80 and 100 percent of the bats usually die, says Marianne Moore, a bat researcher at Boston University. Northeastern bats hunt insects, including some that are pests. So a lack of bats “could be a huge problem,” Moore says. Scientists still aren’t sure if the white fuzz is the killer. The mold may just attack bats when they are already sick and more likely to get other illnesses. But, identifying the fungus may help scientists find out if it’s the killer. To figure out what the fungus was, scientists studied it in a lab. They took samples of the mold from sick bats. Then the scientists brought the samples to a lab, where they could grow and be compared to other molds. At room temperature, the scientists’ efforts were thwarted — samples of this mystery mold wouldn’t develop. Frustrated, the scientists finally tried putting the samples in the refrigerator. This cooled the samples down to temperatures found in bat caves during the winter. Sure enough, when the lab samples were chilly, an unfamiliar form of mold began to grow. The scientists think it may be an entirely new species, or type, of mold or a new form of an existing species. What’s unusual about the new mold is that it won’t survive in higher temperatures, says David Blehert of the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Wildlife Health Center in Madison, Wisc. He and colleagues were part of the study that tried to grow and identify the mold in the lab. Human noses, for example, are way too warm for the fungus. In hibernation, “a bat for all practical purposes is almost dead” says Blehert. The heart of an active bat beats hundreds of times per minute. This can drop as low as about four beats per minute during hibernation. And a bat’s body during this time chills to only a few degrees above the cave’s temperature. The cold temperature of bat caves in New England makes for a perfect home for the mold. This is good news for bats that fly to the warm south in the winter or live in warm, dry places year-round. Their caves will be too warm to host the white fuzz. But the sickness has already hammered at least six species of bats in the Northeast. Two of these bats are the little brown bat and the endangered Indiana bat.

White fuzzy mold not as friendly as it looks
White fuzzy mold not as friendly as it looks








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™