Agriculture
Microbes at the Gas Pump
Growing Healthier Tomato Plants
Got Milk? How?
Amphibians
Salamanders and Newts
Toads
Poison Dart Frogs
Animals
No Fair: Monkey Sees, Doesn't
Lives of a Mole Rat
Return of the Lost Limbs
Behavior
The case of the headless ant
Pipefish power from mom
Bringing fish back up to size
Birds
Kingfishers
Tropical Birds
Quails
Chemistry and Materials
Diamond Glow
Batteries built by Viruses
Spinning Clay into Cotton
Computers
Lighting goes digital
Earth from the inside out
The Book of Life
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Downsized Dinosaurs
A Living Fossil
Hall of Dinos
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Earth's Poles in Peril
Surf Watch
Environment
Swimming with Sharks and Stingrays
What is groundwater
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Finding the Past
Watching deep-space fireworks
Ancient Art on the Rocks
Stone Tablet May Solve Maya Mystery
Fish
Carp
Flashlight Fishes
Manta Rays
Food and Nutrition
A Taste for Cheese
Making good, brown fat
Chocolate Rules
GSAT English Rules
Adjectives and Adverbs
Order of Adjectives
Capitalization Rules
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Math Naturals
Play for Science
Human Body
Kids now getting 'adult' disease
Surviving Olympic Heat
The tell-tale bacteria
Invertebrates
Tarantula
Flies
Termites
Mammals
Marmots
Pomeranians
Elk
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
How children learn
Physics
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Project Music
Einstein's Skateboard
Plants
Stalking Plants by Scent
The algae invasion
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Reptiles
Caimans
Reptiles
Cobras
Space and Astronomy
A Very Distant Planet Says "Cheese"
A Great Ball of Fire
Asteroid Moons
Technology and Engineering
Reach for the Sky
Riding Sunlight
Bionic Bacteria
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Preposition?
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Troubles with Hubble
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Weather
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Science loses out when ice caps melt
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Add your Article

Weird, new ant

In the Amazon rainforests of Brazil, scientists have discovered a peculiar new species of ant. The insect has no eyes. Its body is pale. And its fanglike mouthparts are longer than the rest of its head. If you happened to cross paths with the bizarre ant, you might imagine that it belongs on another planet. Even its name — Martialis heureka — playfully suggests that it came from Mars. But Martialis heureka lives on Earth. And the creepy-crawly discovery is forcing researchers to rethink what they know about the history of ants on our planet. Christian Rabeling, from the University of Texas at Austin, discovered the new species amid the fallen leaves of the rainforest. But he did more than just notice how weird the ant looks. He also analyzed its genetic material, or DNA. Comparing DNA among species can give scientists insights into family trees: The more DNA two species share in common, the more closely related they are, and the more recently they split off from a common ancestor. Rabeling’s DNA analysis of Martialis heureka showed that the species is only distantly related to other ant species. It is so distant, in fact, that it belongs in a separate subfamily — a broader grouping than a species or even a genus. The last time scientists found a new subfamily of living ants was in 1923, say the discoverers. The DNA analysis also suggests that Martialis heureka appeared on Earth earlier than any other ant living here today. And observations suggest that the ant lives underground: Paleness and blindness are two major clues. Some of the other oldest known ant species also live underground. So now, scientists are trying to figure out whether ants first evolved underground, or if they evolved above ground and then went under. Corrie Moreau, an ant specialist at the Field Museum in Chicago, saw a picture of the new creature. “It’s an incredibly bizarre-looking ant … which for ant biologists is really exciting,” she says. A few other ant species have at least one of Martialis heureka’s weird features, she says. But none share them all. So far, Rabeling has collected only one ant from the new species. Finding more specimens, he hopes, will help us better understand the science and history of ants on Earth.

Weird, new ant
Weird, new ant








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™