Agriculture
Springing forward
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Getting the dirt on carbon
Amphibians
Salamanders
Frogs and Toads
Toads
Animals
New Mammals
Thieves of a Feather
Armadillo
Behavior
Longer lives for wild elephants
The Colorful World of Synesthesia
Puberty gone wild
Birds
Birds We Eat
Roadrunners
Kiwis
Chemistry and Materials
Makeup Science
The hottest soup in New York
Boosting Fuel Cells
Computers
Graphene's superstrength
A Light Delay
A New Look at Saturn's rings
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Ferocious Growth Spurts
Meet your mysterious relative
Did Dinosaurs Do Handstands?
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Greener Diet
Groundwater and the Water Cycle
Quick Quake Alerts
Environment
Fishing for Fun Takes Toll
Bald Eagles Forever
Island Extinctions
Finding the Past
Of Lice and Old Clothes
A Big Discovery about Little People
Stone Age Sole Survivors
Fish
Flounder
Megamouth Sharks
Whale Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Food for Life
Yummy bugs
The Color of Health
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. Whom
Whoever vs. Whomever
Order of Adjectives
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT Scholarship
Mastering The GSAT Exam
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Exam Preparation
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Human Body
Heart Revival
Taste Messenger
Spitting Up Blobs to Get Around
Invertebrates
Tapeworms
Ticks
Insects
Mammals
Squirrels
Oxen
Badgers
Parents
Children and Media
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
How children learn
Physics
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Electric Backpack
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
Plants
Fastest Plant on Earth
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
Sweet, Sticky Science
Reptiles
Tortoises
Black Mamba
Box Turtles
Space and Astronomy
Evidence of a Wet Mars
Cool as a Jupiter
A Planet from the Early Universe
Technology and Engineering
Squeezing Oil from Old Wells
Algae Motors
A Clean Getaway
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
Pronouns
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Reach for the Sky
Robots on a Rocky Road
Ready, unplug, drive
Weather
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Either Martians or Mars has gas
Add your Article

Walking Sticks

Phasmids (or Walking Sticks as they are commonly called) are one of the most remarkable orders of insects. They are typically either stick-like or leaf-like; camouflage or mimicry being their defining characteristic. Due to this natural camouflage, finding them in the wild can be very difficult for even an experienced collector. Approximately 3000 species of Walking Sticks exist in the world, about 30 of which live in the United States. My pet stick: Unlike many insects, they make superb pets. Many species are very low maintenance, requiring only blackberry leaves (or similar plant species) and water. Stick-insects prefer to have their cages and leaves misted with a spray bottle, although care must be taken not to drown the fragile nymphs. Others do require heat or humidity to be successful. A Walking Stick will usually live from one to two years, depending on the species. No bones: Walking Sticks have exoskeletons, and instead of growing bones until maturity they grow a new layer of skin beneath the old one, shedding their old skin in the process. Females commonly molt 6 times, and males 5. Playing dead & dancing sticks: Sometimes when Walking Sticks are disturbed, they will lay motionless for hours. They will usually stop playing dead and perk up at nighttime when they do most of their feeding anyway. Another reaction to being disturbed is a swaying movement evolved to mimic sticks or leaves blowing in the wind. And if a gentle breeze is applied, many species will begin to feed. It makes them feel more comfortable about moving. Many species begin to "dance" from the vibrations of footsteps, etc. It has even been claimed that music can cause some Walking Sticks to move this way (probably resulting from vibration). Gentle sticks, scary sticks: While most stick-insects are gentle, there are species that can be downright aggressive. One of the most popularly kept is Eurycantha calcarata. Males of this species are commonly kept separately, and rarely with other stick bug species, as they can be very cannibalistic. They have large spikes on their hind-most set of legs, and do not hesitate to swing them down abruptly. Spraying sticks: When threatened, some species can emit a chemical spray which is irritable to would-be predators. In certain species, this spray can cause temporary blindness and considerable pain. Another species releases an unpleasant odor when held. Walking Sticks commonly lay their eggs in the soil, or on the underside of available leaves. Some species are also parthenogenic, meaning that the male does not need to fertilize the eggs, although fertilization appears to increase the likelihood of the eggs to hatch healthy young.

Walking Sticks
Walking Sticks








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™