Agriculture
Springing forward
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Watering the Air
Amphibians
Toads
Salamanders and Newts
Newts
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A Wild Ferret Rise
Feeding School for Meerkats
Walktopus
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Talking with Hands
The Colorful World of Synesthesia
Wired for Math
Birds
Peafowl
Rheas
Pheasants
Chemistry and Materials
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
The Taste of Bubbles
Meteorites may have sparked life on Earth
Computers
Games with a Purpose
Lighting goes digital
New eyes to scan the skies
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Mammals in the Shadow of Dinosaurs
Meet the new dinos
Some Dinos Dined on Grass
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Earth
Flower family knows its roots
Shrinking Glaciers
Ancient Heights
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Will Climate Change Depose Monarchs?
Catching Some Rays
A Change in Climate
Finding the Past
Sahara Cemetery
Decoding a Beverage Jar
Of Lice and Old Clothes
Fish
Great White Shark
Swordfish
Parrotfish
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The Essence of Celery
Chew for Health
Sponges' secret weapon
GSAT English Rules
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GSAT Mathematics
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
It's a Math World for Animals
A Sweet Advance in Candy Packing
Human Body
Tapeworms and Drug Delivery
Germ Zapper
Kids now getting 'adult' disease
Invertebrates
Spiders
Bees
Giant Squid
Mammals
Mongooses
Golden Retrievers
Gazelle
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
Extra Strings for New Sounds
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Plants
A Giant Flower's New Family
Seeds of the Future
Making the most of a meal
Reptiles
Cobras
Box Turtles
Crocodiles
Space and Astronomy
Icy Red Planet
A Planet's Slim-Fast Plan
Super Star Cluster in the Neighborhood
Technology and Engineering
Switchable Lenses Improve Vision
Machine Copy
Drawing Energy out of Wastewater
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Problems with Prepositions
Transportation
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Robots on a Rocky Road
Ready, unplug, drive
Weather
Recipe for a Hurricane
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
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Unveiling Titan

There's no place like home. Except, maybe, for Saturn's largest moon, Titan. A recent mission to this moon has found that it looks a lot like our planet. The journey began 7 years ago, when the Cassini spacecraft was launched on a mission to explore Saturn. Cassini went into orbit around the planet on July 1, 2004. Then, on Dec. 25, 2004, the European Space Agency's Huygens probe separated from the craft and coasted toward Titan. On Jan. 14, it plunged into the moon's atmosphere. The probe spent 2.5 hours gliding through Titan's atmosphere, and it sent signals from the moon's surface to Cassini for 70 minutes before it lost radio contact with the spacecraft. Cassini, in turn, relayed the information and pictures to astronomers in Germany. The scientists were surprised at how Earth-like Titan appeared. Huygens landed on ground that was hard on top but soft underneath, somewhat like wet sand. The researchers were able to decipher the ground's texture by measuring the force of the probe's impact and comparing it to the effect of forces on various types of terrain on Earth. Huygens took spectacular pictures of drainage channels leading to a shoreline. Photos also showed ground fog and structures that look like sandbars. Astronomers are especially interested in Titan's chemistry, because the moon might provide insights into Earth's early history. Just as Huygens landed, it measured a sharp rise in methane gas. Now, scientists suggest that the moon's channels were carved by liquid methane and ethane, instead of by water, as they would be on Earth. Titan's rocks appear to be made mainly of water-ice. Some of them look like river rocks on our planet. They were probably made round by rolling around in liquid. Titan and Earth have something else in common, too: nonstop weather and geological activity. Huygens showed no major craters on the moon's surface. Icy eruptions and rain probably keep the landscape rugged and constantly changing. Another mission to Saturn's famous moon probably won't happen again for decades. But when spacecraft do eventually get there again, there will probably be plenty more surprises.E. Sohn

Unveiling Titan
Unveiling Titan








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