Agriculture
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Growing Healthier Tomato Plants
Amphibians
Bullfrogs
Toads
Salamanders and Newts
Animals
A Meal Plan for Birds
Missing Moose
Assembling the Tree of Life
Behavior
Two monkeys see a more colorful world
Between a rock and a wet place
Ear pain, weight gain
Birds
Woodpecker
Condors
Chicken
Chemistry and Materials
When frog gender flips
A Butterfly's Electric Glow
Putting the Squeeze on Toothpaste
Computers
Graphene's superstrength
Look into My Eyes
Supersonic Splash
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dinosaurs Grow Up
Supersight for a Dino King
A Rainforest Trapped in Amber
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
The Rise of Yellowstone
Quick Quake Alerts
Easy Ways to Conserve Water
Environment
A Change in Leaf Color
Lessons from a Lonely Tortoise
Seabirds Deliver Arctic Pollutants
Finding the Past
Childhood's Long History
Stonehenge Settlement
The Taming of the Cat
Fish
Piranha
Seahorses
Mahi-Mahi
Food and Nutrition
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
Recipe for Health
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Capitalization Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Mathematics
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Losing with Heads or Tails
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Human Body
Attacking Asthma
Music in the Brain
Fighting Off Micro-Invader Epidemics
Invertebrates
Sponges
Worms
Lice
Mammals
African Zebra
Seal
African Hyenas
Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Children and Media
Physics
Powering Ball Lightning
One ring around them all
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Plants
Stalking Plants by Scent
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
Plants Travel Wind Highways
Reptiles
Iguanas
Crocodiles
Crocodilians
Space and Astronomy
Planet Hunters Nab Three More
Supernovas Shed Light on Dark Energy
Evidence of a Wet Mars
Technology and Engineering
Young Scientists Take Flight
Smart Windows
A Satellite of Your Own
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
Pronouns
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Robots on a Rocky Road
Robots on the Road, Again
How to Fly Like a Bat
Weather
Either Martians or Mars has gas
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Warmest Year on Record
Add your Article

Untangling Human Origins

Nowadays, it's pretty easy to tell a person from an ape. Millions of years ago, the differences would have been much harder to pick out. According to the scientific theory of evolution, apes and people have a common ancestor—one ancient animal from which both species evolved. At some time in the past, however, the creatures that would become humans started to differ from the creatures that would become apes and chimpanzees. A few years ago, anthropologists digging in the African country of Chad discovered some intriguing fossils. They found a skull, along with some teeth and jaw pieces, that was between 6 million and 7 million years old. Because the face and teeth resembled those of later human ancestors, the scientists said that the fossils were those of a human-like, or hominid, species—even though the skull could hold only a chimp-sized brain. They called this creature Sahelanthropus tchadensis. Not everyone agreed with this conclusion. Another group of anthropologists argued that the fossil pieces came from an ancient ape. Now, the scientists who found the bones have dug up more fragments. And, because some of the original skull bits had been squished, the researchers used a computer program to unsquish the pieces and fit them together into a three-dimensional picture of the skull. The newly found teeth look more human than chimp, the researchers say. Moreover, the computer image of the skull shows a human-like flat face. The way the skull meets the spine and neck might also have allowed this primate to walk upright, they add. To confirm this, however, scientists would have to find leg bones as well. The new information strengthens the view that the old bones belong to the earliest known human ancestor, the scientists conclude. This creature lived just after the split between the human and chimpanzee evolutionary families. Other anthropologists still aren't convinced that this is our earliest ancestor. Humans and ancient apes looked a lot alike 7 million years ago, they say, and some features of the fossil skull are more ape-like than human-like.—K. Ramsayer

Untangling Human Origins
Untangling Human Origins








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™