Agriculture
Microbes at the Gas Pump
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Watering the Air
Amphibians
Poison Dart Frogs
Bullfrogs
Frogs and Toads
Animals
Professor Ant
Not Slippery When Wet
Roach Love Songs
Behavior
Swedish Rhapsody
Fighting fat with fat
Fish needs see-through head
Birds
Doves
Hummingbirds
Dodos
Chemistry and Materials
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Flytrap Machine
Mother-of-Pearl on Ice
Computers
The science of disappearing
Small but WISE
The hungry blob at the edge of the universe
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dino-bite!
Dino Takeout for Mammals
Mammals in the Shadow of Dinosaurs
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Island of Hope
Hints of Life in Ancient Lava
Explorer of the Extreme Deep
Environment
Catching Some Rays
Forests as a Tsunami Shield
Swimming with Sharks and Stingrays
Finding the Past
Untangling Human Origins
Sahara Cemetery
Early Maya Writing
Fish
Halibut
Basking Sharks
Hammerhead Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Packing Fat
Eat Out, Eat Smart
Sponges' secret weapon
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Subject and Verb Agreement
Who vs. That vs. Which
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT Exam Preparation
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Mathematics
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Setting a Prime Number Record
Monkeys Count
Human Body
Gut Germs to the Rescue
Cell Phones and Possible Health Hazards
Sea Kids See Clearly Underwater
Invertebrates
Bees
Clams
Millipedes
Mammals
Rodents
Chinchillas
Boxers
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
Gaining a Swift Lift
One ring around them all
Powering Ball Lightning
Plants
Stalking Plants by Scent
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
Surprise Visitor
Reptiles
Komodo Dragons
Crocodiles
Boa Constrictors
Space and Astronomy
Unveiling Titan
A Smashing Display
A Great Ball of Fire
Technology and Engineering
Beyond Bar Codes
Searching for Alien Life
Space Umbrellas to Shield Earth
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Noun
Transportation
Robots on a Rocky Road
Ready, unplug, drive
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Weather
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Arctic Melt
Where rivers run uphill
Add your Article

Tropical Birds

While local wild birds offer their own uniqe birdwatching experience, tropical climates and rainforest environments seem to attract the most vibrantly colored and exotic of bird species. Birds are extremely visual animals, and while you may be familiar with the sight of a bright red male cardinal, imagine the colors and patterns a bird must produce to compete with flowers and trees as brilliant as those in jungle forests. From rainbow lorikeets to vibrant macaws, tropical birds are perhaps the most visually stunning members of the bird family. The unique environment of the rainforest, and other habitats of tropical climates, have resulted in a wide variety of the world's most uniquely colorful birds. From the bright scarlet of macaws to the irridescent blue of peafowl, there seems to be no combination of colors too vibrant for tropical climes. Hundreds of species of parrot live in the rain forest. The scarlet macaw is just one of these. It is also one of the longest, stretching to a length of 3 feet from its head to the tip of its tail. When these macaws eat a poisonous fruit, they eat a special type of clay that gets rid of the poison. Toucans are also very colorful birds. They have large beaks that they use to reach fruit they could not otherwise get to. Scientists estimate there are 33 species of toucan in the rain forest. Not every tropical bird was blessed with looks, however. The hoatzin has the drab brown appearance of a peahen (a female peafowl.) Known for being inept flyers, Hoatzin crash land regularly. The brown kiwi of Australia is an entirely flightless bird with almost fur-like feathers and a long, narrow, curved beak. Despite having neither flight nor brilliant plumage to their credit, they are nevertheless adept runners and fighters.

Tropical Birds
Tropical Birds








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™