Agriculture
Middle school science adventures
Treating peanut allergy bit by bit
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Amphibians
Newts
Bullfrogs
Salamanders
Animals
Ant Invasions Change the Rules
Armadillo
Roach Love Songs
Behavior
The Other Side of the Zoo Fence
Flower family knows its roots
Pipefish power from mom
Birds
Cranes
Blue Jays
Parrots
Chemistry and Materials
Butterfly Wings and Waterproof Coats
Meteorites may have sparked life on Earth
Flytrap Machine
Computers
The hungry blob at the edge of the universe
Fingerprint Evidence
Batteries built by Viruses
Dinosaurs and Fossils
An Ancient Spider's Web
The Paleontologist and the Three Dinosaurs
Meet your mysterious relative
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
On the Trail of America's Next Top Scientists
The Rise of Yellowstone
Riding to Earth's Core
Environment
Easy Ways to Conserve Water
Food Web Woes
Shrinking Fish
Finding the Past
Preserving Ancient Warrior Paint
An Ancient Childhood
A Plankhouse Past
Fish
Mako Sharks
Electric Eel
Sharks
Food and Nutrition
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
Sponges' secret weapon
Food for Life
GSAT English Rules
Pronouns
Order of Adjectives
Finding Subjects and Verbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Exam Preparation
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
Setting a Prime Number Record
Prime Time for Cicadas
Monkeys Count
Human Body
Hear, Hear
A New Touch
Disease Detectives
Invertebrates
Squid
Crawfish
Beetles
Mammals
Dogs
Wildcats
Manatees
Parents
Children and Media
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
How children learn
Physics
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Road Bumps
Invisibility Ring
Plants
Nature's Alphabet
Sweet, Sticky Science
Springing forward
Reptiles
Tortoises
Caimans
Copperhead Snakes
Space and Astronomy
Mercury's magnetic twisters
Chaos Among the Planets
Pluto's New Moons
Technology and Engineering
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
A Light Delay
A Clean Getaway
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Verb?
Transportation
Ready, unplug, drive
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Robots on the Road, Again
Weather
Catching Some Rays
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Watering the Air
Add your Article

Toxic Cleanups Get a Microbe Boost

Garbage can be a huge problem. It not only stinks and takes up space but also can be hazardous to your health. Toxic waste can seep into the soil and pollute the environment. Now, researchers from Cornell University have come up with a technique to help clean up toxic-waste sites. They think bacteria in the soil might help. The idea is to find microbes that naturally break down specific toxic chemicals. To test their strategy, the scientists went to a coal tar waste site belonging to a factory that once converted coal into gas. The waste included a chemical known as naphthalene, the main ingredient of moth balls. They marked a sample of naphthalene with a special atomic label so they could recognize it later and added it to the soil. The researchers wanted to find out if there were tiny microbes in the soil that could break down naphthalene on their own. So, they put glass jars on top of different patches of soil. If microbes were breaking down naphthalene, the jars would fill with carbon dioxide gas marked with the same label the scientists had used to mark the ingredient. That would show where in the soil the helpful bacteria lived. They could then look for those bacteria. The researchers now hope to find bacteria that break down cancer-causing pollutants in coal tar. If it works out, bacteria could become important helpers for cleaning up dangerous chemical messes .E. Sohn

Toxic Cleanups Get a Microbe Boost
Toxic Cleanups Get a Microbe Boost








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™