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Putting a Mouse on Pause
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Fish needs see-through head
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2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Killer Space Rock Snuffed Out Ancient Life
Coral Gardens
Less Mixing Can Affect Lake's Ecosystem
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When Fungi and Algae Marry
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Traces of Ancient Campfires
Childhood's Long History
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Tiger Sharks
A Jellyfish's Blurry View
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In Search of the Perfect French Fry
Making good, brown fat
A Taste for Cheese
GSAT English Rules
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Whoever vs. Whomever
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March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
Mastering The GSAT Exam
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GSAT Scholarship
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Exam Preparation
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How to Slice a Cake Fairly
Monkeys Count
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
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Kids now getting 'adult' disease
Dreaming makes perfect
A Long Haul
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Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
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Road Bumps
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Gaining a Swift Lift
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Hungry bug seeks hot meal
White fuzzy mold not as friendly as it looks
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
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Black Mamba
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Space and Astronomy
Black Holes That Burp
Asteroid Moons
Intruder Alert: Sweeping Space for Dust
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Riding Sunlight
Crime Lab
Drawing Energy out of Wastewater
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
What is a Noun
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Middle school science adventures
Where rivers run uphill
Robots on a Rocky Road
Weather
Catching Some Rays
A Dire Shortage of Water
Either Martians or Mars has gas
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Tiny Pterodactyl

Imagine a creature that's a cross between a dinosaur and a bird and you'll have a good idea of what a pterodactyl looked like. These ancient creatures were reptiles, but they flew. In fact, they were probably the first vertebrates to fly. Pterodactyls could be huge. Some had wingspans that measured up to 10 meters (33 feet). But now, researchers working in northeastern China have found evidence of an extremely small pterodactyl. The animal's wingspan measured just 25 centimeters (10 inches). The creature was about the size of a house sparrow. The tiny pterodactyl has been named Nemicolopterus crypticus, which means "hidden flying forest dweller." The animal had no teeth. And it lived 120 million years ago, say the scientists who found the fossil. They work at the National Museum of the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, in Brazil. The scientists found the fossil buried in rocks. Other fossils found in these same rocks indicate that the region used to be at the bottom of a lake in a heavily forested area. Many of the bones in the animal's feet were strongly curved. That suggests that N. crypticus spent a lot of time grasping tree limbs, says lead researcher Alexander W.A. Kellner. On the basis of the size of its skull bones, the researchers could tell that the animal was not fully grown. They don't know how much bigger it might have become. But, Kellner says, "even if it were doubled in size, it would still be the smallest pterosaur yet found."—Emily Sohn

Tiny Pterodactyl
Tiny Pterodactyl








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