Agriculture
Microbes at the Gas Pump
Treating peanut allergy bit by bit
Making the most of a meal
Amphibians
Frogs and Toads
Toads
Newts
Animals
Vent Worms Like It Hot
Poor Devils
Hearing Whales
Behavior
A brain-boosting video game
Fear Matters
The chemistry of sleeplessness
Birds
Geese
Pelicans
Kookaburras
Chemistry and Materials
Butterfly Wings and Waterproof Coats
Bandages that could bite back
Makeup Science
Computers
Getting in Touch with Touch
The Shape of the Internet
Electronic Paper Turns a Page
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Watery Fate for Nature's Gliders
Ancient Critter Caught Shedding Its Skin
Dino-bite!
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Less Mixing Can Affect Lake's Ecosystem
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Flower family knows its roots
Environment
Swimming with Sharks and Stingrays
Animal CSI or from Science Lab to Crime Lab
Blooming Jellies
Finding the Past
Childhood's Long History
A Human Migration Fueled by Dung?
Ancient Art on the Rocks
Fish
Seahorses
Electric Eel
Marlin
Food and Nutrition
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
The Essence of Celery
The Color of Health
GSAT English Rules
Problems with Prepositions
Whoever vs. Whomever
Who vs. That vs. Which
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Scholarship
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Mathematics
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Losing with Heads or Tails
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
Human Body
Running with Sneaker Science
A Fix for Injured Knees
What the appendix is good for
Invertebrates
Termites
Giant Clam
Fleas
Mammals
Dogs
African Zebra
Oxen
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Children and Media
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
Electric Backpack
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Road Bumps
Plants
The algae invasion
Plants Travel Wind Highways
Seeds of the Future
Reptiles
Garter Snakes
Asp
Chameleons
Space and Astronomy
Planets on the Edge
Supernovas Shed Light on Dark Energy
A Smashing Display
Technology and Engineering
Bionic Bacteria
Drawing Energy out of Wastewater
Model Plane Flies the Atlantic
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
Pronouns
What is a Noun
Transportation
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Weather
A Change in Climate
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Warmest Year on Record
Add your Article

The Puzzle of Ancient Mariners

You've heard of Christopher Columbus. You've read about the Vikings. But who made the first-ever sea voyage? According to one archaeologist's radical new theory, the first sailors weren't quite human. Robert G. Bednarik thinks that the first species to build a boat and make an ocean journey was not our own, Homo sapiens, but our predecessor, Homo erectus. The latter is the humanlike species that existed before H. sapiens and may have been our direct ancestor. H. erectus had slightly smaller brains set in longer, lower braincases than ours. If Bednarik is right, the first ocean voyage took place not 40,000 years ago, but as early as 800,000 years ago—when H. erectus may have traveled from the island of Bali to neighboring islands in southern Indonesia. To test his theory, Bednarik had a bamboo raft built using stone tools like those H. erectus might have had. He and 11 crewmembers then paddled the raft 18 miles across rough waters from Bali to the island of Lombok. On their first trial voyage, the ocean currents pushed the crew too far north, and they had to give up. On their second trial, one of the crewmembers collapsed from exhaustion. But they finally made it—and if they could do it, Bednarik says, so could H. erectus, 800,000 years ago. Not everyone agrees. Some researchers say that H. erectus didn't have the intelligence to build a boat or to plan a journey. Instead, members of that species might have drifted to Lombok and other islands on huge, floating masses of seaweed that are strong enough to support a person. However they got there, their daring voyages sound a lot like extreme sports, Stone-Age style!—S. McDonagh

The Puzzle of Ancient Mariners
The Puzzle of Ancient Mariners








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™