Agriculture
Flush-Free Fertilizer
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Middle school science adventures
Amphibians
Bullfrogs
Frogs and Toads
Tree Frogs
Animals
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Fishing for Giant Squid
Copybees
Behavior
World’s largest lizard is venomous too
Newly named fish crawls and hops
Giving Sharks Safe Homes
Birds
Kiwis
Flightless Birds
Robins
Chemistry and Materials
Cooking Up Superhard Diamonds
Revving Up Green Machines
Boosting Fuel Cells
Computers
Computers with Attitude
New eyes to scan the skies
Two monkeys see a more colorful world
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Early Birds Ready to Rumble
Digging for Ancient DNA
Fossil Forests
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
A Volcano's Deadly Ash
A Volcano Wakes Up
Hints of Life in Ancient Lava
Environment
Groundwater and the Water Cycle
Sounds and Silence
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Finding the Past
Prehistoric Trips to the Dentist
A Long Haul
A Human Migration Fueled by Dung?
Fish
Bass
Basking Sharks
Parrotfish
Food and Nutrition
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
Recipe for Health
Chew for Health
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. That vs. Which
Subject and Verb Agreement
Who vs. Whom
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Mathematics
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Prime Time for Cicadas
Human Body
Spit Power
Dreaming makes perfect
Don't Eat That Sandwich!
Invertebrates
Sea Urchin
Squid
Scorpions
Mammals
Rottweilers
Lhasa Apsos
Gazelle
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Children and Media
Physics
The Particle Zoo
One ring around them all
Spin, Splat, and Scramble
Plants
Stalking Plants by Scent
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Getting the dirt on carbon
Reptiles
Reptiles
Alligators
Turtles
Space and Astronomy
Ready, Set, Supernova
Icy Red Planet
Return to Space
Technology and Engineering
Supersuits for Superheroes
Smart Windows
Beyond Bar Codes
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
What is a Preposition?
What is a Noun
Transportation
Charged cars that would charge
How to Fly Like a Bat
Middle school science adventures
Weather
Watering the Air
Where rivers run uphill
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Add your Article

The Particle Zoo

Particles are the building blocks of matter, and matter makes up everything you can see. The Earth and moon are matter. So is your body, your computer’s screen, even the air you breathe. Which means they’re all made of particles. Particles are the building blocks of matter, and matter makes up everything you can see. The Earth and moon are matter. So is your body, your computer’s screen, even the air you breathe. Which means they’re all made of particles. Lots and lots of particles, of all different kinds, stuck together. Atoms, which used to be considered the smallest unit of matter, are made from particles too. Just how small is an atom? That’s a tricky question, since different atoms have different sizes and atoms are mostly empty space. But here’s one way to think about it: Let’s say you wanted to fill up a baseball-sized bowl with gold atoms. You’d need roughly twice as many of these atoms as it would take to fill an Earth-sized bowl with baseballs. Particles that are even smaller than an atom are called “subatomic.” The main subatomic particles that make up atoms are protons, electrons and neutrons. But some of these particles are also made of even smaller particles. Protons and neutrons, for example, are made of subatomic particles called “quarks.” There are six kinds of quarks, each with a weird name: up, down, strange, charm, top and bottom. Dozens of types of subatomic particle exist, and scientists suspect there may be still more to discover. When a new type emerges, scientists tend to give them pretty odd-sounding names. To date, we’ve got bosons, fermions, leptons, muons, pions, neutrinos, photons, gluons, and gravitons. Neutrinos are unusually weird because they have almost no mass and they fly through space at almost the speed of light. Three types exist: muon neutrinos, electron neutrinos and tau neutrinos. And the strangest particle of all: the tachyon. It’s considered “hypothetical,” which means it might not even exist. If it does, it can go faster than the speed of light and travel back in time. No wonder some physicists refer to these — the smallest inhabitants of our universe — as their “particle zoo.”

The Particle Zoo
The Particle Zoo








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™