Agriculture
Treating peanut allergy bit by bit
Got Milk? How?
Seeds of the Future
Amphibians
Salamanders
Frogs and Toads
Poison Dart Frogs
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Vampire Bats on the Run
Cacophony Acoustics
G-Tunes with a Message
Behavior
Slumber by the numbers
How Much Babies Know
Giving Sharks Safe Homes
Birds
Hawks
Quails
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Chemistry and Materials
Sticking Around with Gecko Tape
Nanomagnets Corral Oil
Makeup Science
Computers
Small but WISE
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Programming with Alice
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dinosaurs Grow Up
Dino Flesh from Fossil Bone
A Really Big (but Extinct) Rodent
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Surf Watch
Ancient Heights
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Environment
Hazy with a Chance of Sunshine
When Fungi and Algae Marry
The Oily Gulf
Finding the Past
Of Lice and Old Clothes
A Long Trek to Asia
Preserving Ancient Warrior Paint
Fish
Marlin
Great White Shark
Carp
Food and Nutrition
Building a Food Pyramid
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
How Super Are Superfruits?
GSAT English Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
Problems with Prepositions
Who vs. That vs. Which
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Mathematics
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
It's a Math World for Animals
A Sweet Advance in Candy Packing
Human Body
Disease Detectives
Music in the Brain
Spit Power
Invertebrates
Leeches
Oysters
Insects
Mammals
Ponies
African Hyenas
Black Bear
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Plants
Springing forward
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Fastest Plant on Earth
Reptiles
Box Turtles
Lizards
Rattlesnakes
Space and Astronomy
Wrong-way planets do gymnastics
World of Three Suns
Unveiling Titan
Technology and Engineering
Riding Sunlight
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Model Plane Flies the Atlantic
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Adjectives and Adverbs
Problems with Prepositions
Transportation
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Middle school science adventures
Reach for the Sky
Weather
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Earth's Poles in Peril
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
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The Down Side of Keeping Clean

Wash your hands. Brush your teeth. Scrub the toilet. Do the dishes. Being clean is supposed to keep us healthy by destroying bacteria that make us sick. But our meticulous attention to cleanliness might have a down side. New research suggests that the chemicals we use to clean and disinfect could be damaging the environment by killing off algae at the base of the food chain. Over the past decade, the war against bacteria has been escalating. From dish soap to toothpaste, cleaning products have become increasingly deadly to the tiny troublemakers. After getting dumped down the drain, those household chemicals usually go straight through the sewer system and into lakes and streams, ignored by wastewater treatment plants. Curious about the environmental effects of all that chemical runoff, environmental scientist Brittan A. Wilson of the University of Kansas in Lawrence and colleagues collected algae from a Kansas stream. In the lab, the scientists doused the algae with three common household chemicals in concentrations comparable to levels often found in American streams. The number of species of algae and overall growth of algae dropped in samples treated with the chemicals, but not in untreated samples, the researchers report. Those results may be alarming, but they shouldn't be a complete surprise. "It's stupid to think that chemicals that keep toothpaste safe from bacteria won't have an effect at the other end of the sewer pipe," says ecologist Stanley I. Dodson of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. What is surprising is that even low concentrations of the chemicals can have a big effect.E. Sohn

The Down Side of Keeping Clean
The Down Side of Keeping Clean








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