Agriculture
Making the most of a meal
Middle school science adventures
Fast-flying fungal spores
Amphibians
Frogs and Toads
Salamanders
Toads
Animals
Copybees
Spotting the World's Leggiest Animal
A Sense of Danger
Behavior
The Colorful World of Synesthesia
Fear Matters
Brainy bees know two from three
Birds
Songbirds
Finches
Kingfishers
Chemistry and Materials
The science of disappearing
Cooking Up Superhard Diamonds
The memory of a material
Computers
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
A New Look at Saturn's rings
New twists for phantom limbs
Dinosaurs and Fossils
The Paleontologist and the Three Dinosaurs
Dinosaur Dig
Middle school science adventures
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Undersea Vent System Active for Ages
Warmest Year on Record
Earth's Lowly Rumble
Environment
Hazy with a Chance of Sunshine
Toxic Cleanups Get a Microbe Boost
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Finding the Past
Traces of Ancient Campfires
Childhood's Long History
Little People Cause Big Surprise
Fish
Puffer Fish
Tilapia
Eels
Food and Nutrition
Building a Food Pyramid
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
Strong Bones for Life
GSAT English Rules
Problems with Prepositions
Who vs. That vs. Which
Order of Adjectives
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Scholarship
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
Deep-space dancers
Math of the World
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Human Body
A Sour Taste in Your Mouth
Sun Screen
Taking the sting out of scorpion venom
Invertebrates
Daddy Long Legs
Hermit Crabs
Sea Urchin
Mammals
Whales
Raccoons
Beagles
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Children and Media
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Powering Ball Lightning
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
Plants
Farms sprout in cities
Fast-flying fungal spores
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
Reptiles
Turtles
Geckos
Anacondas
Space and Astronomy
A Whole Lot of Nothing
A Moon's Icy Spray
An Earthlike Planet
Technology and Engineering
Squeezing Oil from Old Wells
Toy Challenge
Machine Copy
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
Adjectives and Adverbs
Pronouns
Transportation
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Reach for the Sky
Where rivers run uphill
Weather
Either Martians or Mars has gas
Warmest Year on Record
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Add your Article

Taste Messenger

It can be hard to imagine life without a sense of taste. Ice cream would feel cold and smooth without the sweetness. Peanut butter would seem sticky and thick without the nuttiness. Apples would be crispy and juicy without the tartness. Scientists have long known that different foods stimulate taste buds in our mouths in different ways. Taste buds then send messages along nerves to the brain about the food's flavor. What's been missing for scientists, however, is an understanding of how these messages about taste get from taste buds in the tongue to the body's nervous system. Now, researchers from Colorado State University in Fort Collins and elsewhere say that they have found the flavor messenger. A molecule called adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) seems to be the missing link. ATP normally works to store and transport energy within cells. Scientists had noticed that ATP occasionally also works as a neurotransmitter, a molecule that sends messages from one nerve cell to another. In some cases, for example, it takes information about the amount of oxygen in your blood and tells your nerves what it has found. To see whether ATP could also carry information about flavor, the scientists first studied taste buds that had been taken out of normal mice. When stimulated with flavored liquids, the buds released ATP. Next, the team worked with mutated mice that were unable to transport ATP into cells. The nerves in these mice reacted to touch, but did not respond to flavor chemicals. Finally, the researchers put mice in cages with two water bottles. One bottle held water. The other held different types of flavored liquids. The results showed that normal mice liked some of the flavored drinks better than water. Some, they liked less. The mutated mice, on the other hand, couldn't tell the difference between water and the flavored liquids. They drank any one liquid as often as the others. The findings suggest that ATP is the reason that you can tell the difference between chocolate pudding and mud. Life without it as a taste messenger would be a lot less interesting.E. Sohn

Taste Messenger
Taste Messenger








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™