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Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
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Hungry bug seeks hot meal
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Sleep Affects a Bird's Singing
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2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
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Sky Dust Keeps Falling on Your Head
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Meteorites may have sparked life on Earth
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Acid Snails
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Results of GSAT are in schools this week
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Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
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42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
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A Sweet Advance in Candy Packing
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Flu Patrol
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Hey batter, wake up!
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Seal
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What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
How children learn
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
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Project Music
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Einstein's Skateboard
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Getting the dirt on carbon
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Killers from Outer Space
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Chaos Among the Planets
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Bionic Bacteria
A Clean Getaway
Drawing Energy out of Wastewater
The Parts of Speech
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Transportation
Ready, unplug, drive
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Where rivers run uphill
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Either Martians or Mars has gas
Warmest Year on Record
The solar system's biggest junkyard
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Switchable Lenses Improve Vision

Some people have the impression that wearing eyeglasses can make you look smarter. Someday, your glasses themselves might actually be smarter. Scientists are developing "smart" lenses that sense where your eyes are looking and automatically focus to help you see more clearly. The main market for the glasses is adults older than 45—perhaps your parents or grandparents. At this point in life, most people start to get worse at seeing things that are close to them, such as books and computer screens. When the decline begins, people usually start wearing reading glasses. Or, they get bifocals, which have divided lenses—a top part for seeing far and a bottom part for seeing near. Some kids with vision problems have to wear such glasses, too. University researchers are working with a company called PixelOptics, in Roanoke, Va., to replace bifocals with electric lenses that can switch quickly from one type of focus to another. "You don't have just the bottom half of your eyeglasses" for close vision, says electrical engineer David L. Mathine of the University of Arizona in Tucson. He's one of the inventors. "You get the whole view," he says. Each lens is made from two layers, and each layer is made up of two sheets of glass, with a thin layer of fluid sandwiched between the sheets. The fluid contains a transparent type of material called a liquid crystal, which is made of molecules that are shaped like rods. To change a lens' focus, scientists apply electricity to the inner surface of one of the glass sheets in each layer. In response to the electricity, the crystal rods rotate. Their direction determines how quickly light passes through the liquid-crystal layer. The process allows the material to focus light so that a crisp image forms inside the viewer's eyes. Scientists had made similar, electrically controlled lenses before, but these earlier lenses couldn't focus well enough or change focus quickly enough to be useful in eyeglasses, the inventors say. PixelOptics has announced that it also plans to make a version of the glasses that will help people achieve extrasharp vision—even better than normal 20/20 eyesight.—E. Sohn

Switchable Lenses Improve Vision
Switchable Lenses Improve Vision








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