Agriculture
Middle school science adventures
Silk’s superpowers
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Amphibians
Newts
Salamanders
Salamanders and Newts
Animals
No Fair: Monkey Sees, Doesn't
A Fallout Feast for Crabs
Not Slippery When Wet
Behavior
Lost Sight, Found Sound
Swedish Rhapsody
The Snappy Lingo of Instant Messages
Birds
Storks
Cranes
Robins
Chemistry and Materials
Diamond Glow
Smelly Traps for Lampreys
Moon Crash, Splash
Computers
Two monkeys see a more colorful world
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
The science of disappearing
Dinosaurs and Fossils
From Mammoth to Modern Elephant
Winged Insects May Go Way Back
Dinosaurs Grow Up
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Getting the dirt on carbon
Salty, Old and, Perhaps, a Sign of Early Life
A Dire Shortage of Water
Environment
Fungus Hunt
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
A Change in Time
Finding the Past
The Puzzle of Ancient Mariners
Little People Cause Big Surprise
Words of the Distant Past
Fish
Parrotfish
A Jellyfish's Blurry View
Skates and Rays
Food and Nutrition
Making good, brown fat
Building a Food Pyramid
Yummy bugs
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. Whom
Pronouns
Order of Adjectives
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Mathematics
Prime Time for Cicadas
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Play for Science
Human Body
Flu Patrol
A Long Haul
Sleeping Soundly for a Longer Life
Invertebrates
Bees
Ants
Millipedes
Mammals
Bobcats
Gerbils
Chipmunks
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Einstein's Skateboard
Plants
Making the most of a meal
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
Reptiles
Tortoises
Snapping Turtles
Crocodilians
Space and Astronomy
Phantom Energy and the Big Rip
Holes in Martian moon mystery
Asteroid Lost and Found
Technology and Engineering
Musclebots Take Some Steps
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Toy Challenge
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Problems with Prepositions
What is a Noun
Transportation
Troubles with Hubble
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Ready, unplug, drive
Weather
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Add your Article

Sturgeons

Sturgeon (Acipenser) is a genus of freshwater fish, which includes twenty known species from European, Asiatic and North American rivers. They spend a large part of the year in the sea, but periodically migrate to large rivers to deposit their spawn or for unknown reasons. Only a few species of sturgeon are confined to fresh water. No species occur in the tropics or in the southern hemisphere. Sturgeons generally range in size from 8 to 11 feet (2.5 to 3.5 m) in length, and some species grow to a much larger size. Sturgeon are bottom-feeders. They stir up the soft bottom of the sea with their projecting wedge shaped snout, and use their sensitive barbels detect shells, crustaceans and small fish to eat. Since they don't have teeth, they are unable to seize larger prey. Early in summer, sturgeon migrate to rivers and freshwater lakes in large shoals for breeding purposes. The ova are very small and very numerous! One female is said to have produced about three million in one season. The ova of some species have been observed to hatch very shortly after fertilization. The growth of the young is very rapid, but we do not know how long the fry remain in fresh water before their first migration to the sea. After the young sturgeon have matured, their growth slows substantially, but will continue for many years. Frederick the Great placed a number of them in the Garder See Lake in Pomerania about 1780; some of these were found alive in 1866. Professor von Baer also claims that he has directly observed that the Hausen (Acipenser huso) can live up to 100 years. Caviar: In places where sturgeon is harvested in large quantities, like the rivers of southern Russia and on the great lakes of North America, their flesh is dried, smoked or salted. The ovaries, which are very large, are prepared for caviar through beatings with switches, and then pressed through sieves, so that the eggs can be collected in a tub. Sturgeon Trivia: Some people believe that sturgeon scales are hard enough to repel bullets. Isinglass, a form of gelatine from sturgeon fish bladders, is used as processing aids in the "fining" or filtration process of wine making. In the plot of Gordon Korman's MacDonald Hall books (especially in the third book, Beware the Fish) there are many references to this kind of fish: the headmaster of the school is called Mr. Sturgeon, and is nicknamed The Fish.

Sturgeons
Sturgeons








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™