Agriculture
Watering the Air
Watching out for vultures
Fast-flying fungal spores
Amphibians
Newts
Toads
Salamanders and Newts
Animals
Firefly Delight
Sleepless at Sea
From Chimps to People
Behavior
Newly named fish crawls and hops
Surprise Visitor
Girls are cool for school
Birds
Roadrunners
Robins
Carnivorous Birds
Chemistry and Materials
Hair Detectives
Gooey Secrets of Mussel Power
Atom Hauler
Computers
Programming with Alice
Games with a Purpose
Middle school science adventures
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Ancient Critter Caught Shedding Its Skin
Watery Fate for Nature's Gliders
Battling Mastodons
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Earth's Poles in Peril
Distant Quake Changes Geyser Eruptions
Challenging the Forces of Nature
Environment
Whale Watch
Food Web Woes
Lessons from a Lonely Tortoise
Finding the Past
A Big Discovery about Little People
Oldest Writing in the New World
Big Woman of the Distant Past
Fish
Seahorses
Angler Fish
Bull Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Making good, brown fat
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
Symbols from the Stone Age
GSAT English Rules
Order of Adjectives
Pronouns
Capitalization Rules
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Mathematics
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Math Naturals
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
Human Body
Spitting Up Blobs to Get Around
Hear, Hear
Spit Power
Invertebrates
Mussels
Tarantula
Shrimps
Mammals
Mule
African Jackal
Kangaroos
Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
One ring around them all
Einstein's Skateboard
Electric Backpack
Plants
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
Springing forward
Reptiles
Tortoises
Boa Constrictors
Garter Snakes
Space and Astronomy
Baby Star
Holes in Martian moon mystery
Supernovas Shed Light on Dark Energy
Technology and Engineering
Crime Lab
Toy Challenge
Slip Sliming Away
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
What is a Verb?
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Where rivers run uphill
Robots on the Road, Again
Charged cars that would charge
Weather
Science loses out when ice caps melt
A Dire Shortage of Water
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
Add your Article

Speedy Gene Gives Runners a Boost

No matter how hard you push yourself, you probably still canít run as fast as some of your friends. Even with tons of training, most of us could never be Olympians. In fact, if you watch elite sprinters in action, you might think they are just born with something the rest of us donít have. Now, new research suggests what that might be. Speedy runners are more likely to have a certain gene than other people, say scientists in Australia. The gene tells the body to make a protein called alpha-actinin-3. This protein works in fast-twitch muscles, which provide bursts of power for activities like sprinting or speed skating. Kathryn North of Children's Hospital at Westmead in Sydney, Australia, and her colleagues thought the protein might affect sprinting speed. So, the researchers compared star sprinters to endurance athletes and other people. In their study, 94 percent of sprinters and speed skaters had the gene for making alpha-actinin-3. In comparison, only 82 percent of non-athletes had it. And 76 percent of marathon runners and other endurance athletes had it. Alpha-actinin-3 might give sprinters an extra boost when they need it. And North suggests that not having the protein might help endurance athletes stay strong during lengthy exertion. The research may eventually help explain why some people are so much faster than others. But even if you arenít biologically destined to break records at the 100-meter dash, keep practicing your stride. There might be marathons in your future!óE. Sohn

Speedy Gene Gives Runners a Boost
Speedy Gene Gives Runners a Boost








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™