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Flush-Free Fertilizer
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Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Amphibians
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Salamanders and Newts
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Gliders in the Family
A Meal Plan for Birds
A Wild Ferret Rise
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Island of Hope
When Darwin got sick of feathers
Pondering the puzzling platypus
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Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
The Taste of Bubbles
Gooey Secrets of Mussel Power
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New twists for phantom limbs
Look into My Eyes
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A Really Big (but Extinct) Rodent
Dino-bite!
Hall of Dinos
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Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
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What is groundwater
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Plastic-munching microbes
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Will Climate Change Depose Monarchs?
Eating Up Foul Sewage Smells
Finding the Past
Of Lice and Old Clothes
A Long Haul
Meet your mysterious relative
Fish
White Tip Sharks
Mako Sharks
Goldfish
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A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
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Making good, brown fat
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
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GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
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Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
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How to Slice a Cake Fairly
Math of the World
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Foul Play?
Tapeworms and Drug Delivery
Hey batter, wake up!
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African Zebra
Koalas
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What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
How children learn
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IceCube Science
One ring around them all
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Plants
Making the most of a meal
Getting the dirt on carbon
Nature's Alphabet
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Geckos
Space and Astronomy
Holes in Martian moon mystery
A Dusty Birthplace
Planet Hunters Nab Three More
Technology and Engineering
Crime Lab
Reach for the Sky
Spinach Power for Solar Cells
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
Problems with Prepositions
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Revving Up Green Machines
Weather
Warmest Year on Record
Earth's Poles in Peril
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
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Songbirds

Listen outside in any season, at almost any time of day, and you'll hear them: songbirds. Although most birds make some kind of noise, songbirds put on a particularly brilliant show, using their voices to produce pleasing whistles, chirps, and melodies to challenge one another, attract a mate, or communicate with other members of their species. Bird songs between species are so unique that birdwatchers can identify species just by the song they're singing. A songbird is a bird belonging to the suborder Oscines of Passeriformes (ca. 4000 species), in which the vocal organ is developed in such a way as to produce various sound notes, commonly known as bird song. Songbirds evolved about 50 million years ago in the western part of Gondwana that later became Australia, New Zealand and Antarctica and later spread around the world. This 'bird song' is essentially territorial in that it communicates the identity and whereabouts of an individual to other birds and also signals sexual intentions. It is not to be confused with bird calls which are used for alarms and contact, and are especially important in birds that feed or migrate in flocks. Other birds have songs to attract mates or hold territory, but these are usually simple and repetitive, lacking the variety of many passerine songs. The monotonous repetition of the Common Cuckoo or Little Crake can be contrasted with the variety of a Nightingale or Marsh Warbler. Although many songbirds have songs which are pleasant to the human ear, this is not invariably the case. Many members of the crow family make croaks or screeches which sound harsh to humans

Songbirds
Songbirds








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