Agriculture
Getting the dirt on carbon
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Silk’s superpowers
Amphibians
Toads
Frogs and Toads
Poison Dart Frogs
Animals
Fishy Cleaners
Clone Wars
Ant Invasions Change the Rules
Behavior
Brainy bees know two from three
Girls are cool for school
Brain cells take a break
Birds
Storks
Eagles
Nightingales
Chemistry and Materials
Atomic Drive
These gems make their own way
The memory of a material
Computers
The solar system's biggest junkyard
A New Look at Saturn's rings
Getting in Touch with Touch
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Mammals in the Shadow of Dinosaurs
Dinosaurs Grow Up
Have shell, will travel
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Surf Watch
Quick Quake Alerts
Arctic Algae Show Climate Change
Environment
An Ocean View's Downside
Shrinking Fish
Pollution Detective
Finding the Past
Of Lice and Old Clothes
Little People Cause Big Surprise
A Long Haul
Fish
Eels
White Tip Sharks
Pygmy Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Building a Food Pyramid
Healing Honey
Making good, brown fat
GSAT English Rules
Adjectives and Adverbs
Whoever vs. Whomever
Subject and Verb Agreement
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
Monkeys Count
Math Naturals
Setting a Prime Number Record
Human Body
Speedy Gene Gives Runners a Boost
Taking the sting out of scorpion venom
What the appendix is good for
Invertebrates
Hermit Crabs
Crawfish
Krill
Mammals
Doberman Pinschers
Tasmanian Devil
Whales
Parents
Children and Media
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Dreams of Floating in Space
Plants
The algae invasion
White fuzzy mold not as friendly as it looks
Springing forward
Reptiles
Caimans
Cobras
Snakes
Space and Astronomy
Pluto's New Moons
Witnessing a Rare Venus Eclipse
A Great Ball of Fire
Technology and Engineering
Squeezing Oil from Old Wells
Weaving with Light
Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
Problems with Prepositions
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Middle school science adventures
Robots on a Rocky Road
Where rivers run uphill
Weather
Watering the Air
A Dire Shortage of Water
Catching Some Rays
Add your Article

Seabirds Deliver Arctic Pollutants

Birds are famous for carrying things from place to place. Some, like homing pigeons, can be trained to deliver messages and packages. Other birds unknowingly carry pollen, burrs, and seeds that latch on for the ride. Canadian scientists have found a worrisome, new example of the power that birds have to spread stuff around. Way up north in the Canadian Arctic, seabirds are picking up dangerous chemicals in the ocean and delivering them to ponds near where the birds live. Some 10,000 pairs of the birds, called northern fulmars, make their nests on Devon Island, which is 640 kilometers (400 miles) north of the Arctic Circle. The fulmars travel as far as 400 kilometers (250 miles) over the sea to find food. When they return home, their droppings end up all around their nesting sites, including in nearby ponds. Previously, scientists have noticed pollutants arriving in the Arctic with the wind. Salmon also carry dangerous chemicals, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), as the fish migrate between rivers and the sea. The bodies of fish, people, and other meat-eaters can build up high levels of the chemicals. To test the polluting power of northern fulmars, researchers from the University of Ottawa in Ontario collected sediment from 11 ponds on Devon Island. In ponds closest to the colony, the results showed that there was 10 times more of the pesticide hexachlorobenzene, 25 times more mercury, and 60 times more DDT than in ponds less affected by the birds. The pollutants in the ponds, the study suggested, appear to come from fish that the birds eat when they're out on the ocean. People who live, hunt, or fish near bird colonies like those on Devon Island need to be careful, the researchers say. The birds don't mean to cause harm, but the chemicals they carry can cause major problems.—E. Sohn

Seabirds Deliver Arctic Pollutants
Seabirds Deliver Arctic Pollutants








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™