Agriculture
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Keeping Bugs Away from Food
Amphibians
Salamanders
Tree Frogs
Bullfrogs
Animals
Walktopus
Eyes on the Depths
New Mammals
Behavior
Math is a real brain bender
Pain Expectations
Puberty gone wild
Birds
Carnivorous Birds
Ospreys
Storks
Chemistry and Materials
Makeup Science
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
Computers
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
It's a Small E-mail World After All
The science of disappearing
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Battling Mastodons
Fingerprinting Fossils
Watery Fate for Nature's Gliders
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
A Global Warming Flap
Earth's Lowly Rumble
Groundwater and the Water Cycle
Environment
A Stormy History
Out in the Cold
Catching Some Rays
Finding the Past
Of Lice and Old Clothes
Settling the Americas
Little People Cause Big Surprise
Fish
Catfish
Goldfish
Flounder
Food and Nutrition
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
The Essence of Celery
A Taste for Cheese
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. Whom
Adjectives and Adverbs
Subject and Verb Agreement
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Losing with Heads or Tails
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Human Body
Foul Play?
Germ Zapper
Teen Brains, Under Construction
Invertebrates
Insects
Scallops
Sponges
Mammals
Sun Bear
Dalmatians
Gerbils
Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Invisibility Ring
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
Plants
Farms sprout in cities
Plants Travel Wind Highways
Fastest Plant on Earth
Reptiles
Boa Constrictors
Crocodiles
Rattlesnakes
Space and Astronomy
Icy Red Planet
Cool as a Jupiter
Sun Flips Out to Flip-Flop
Technology and Engineering
Supersuits for Superheroes
Shape Shifting
Drawing Energy out of Wastewater
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Verb?
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Troubles with Hubble
Ready, unplug, drive
Weather
Recipe for a Hurricane
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Add your Article

Scottish Folds

The Scottish Fold is a breed of cat with a natural mutation to its ears. The ear cartilage contains a fold so the ears bend forward and down toward the front of their head. Either/Or: Scottish Folds can be either long or short-haired, and they may have any coat color combination except for Siamese-style points. Pointed Folds have been bred but they are not eligible for showing. The original cats only had one fold in their ears, but due to selective breeding they have increased the fold to a double or triple crease that lies the ear totally flat against the head. Scottish Rose: The original Scottish Fold was a long-haired white-haired barn cat named Susie, who was found at a farm near Coupar Angus in Perthshire, Scotland in 1961. Susie's ears had an unusual fold in their middle, making her resemble an owl. When Susie had kittens, two of them were born with folded ears, and one of the siblings was acquired by William Ross, a neighboring farmer and cat-fancier. Ross registered the breed with the Governing Council of the Cat Fancy in Great Britain and started to breed Scottish Fold kittens with the help of geneticist Pat Turner. The breeding program produced 76 kittens in the first three years - 42 with folded ears and 34 with straight ears. The conclusion from this was that the ear mutation is due to a simple dominant gene. If one parent provides the gene for straight ears, and one parent provides the gene for folded ears, the kittens will be Folds. One Fold Too Many: The breed was not accepted for showing in Great Britain and Europe as it was felt that they would be extremely prone to ear problems such as infection, mites and deafness, but the folds were exported to America and the breed continued to be established there using crosses with British Shorthair and the American Shorthair. There is one medical problem that has been found to be related to Scottish Fold breeding. If both parents have folded ears, their kittens will be extremely prone to developing a painful degenerative joint disease that fuses the tail, ankles and knees. This condition also affects Scottish folds with one copy of the fold gene, to a lesser degree, and is the reason the breed is not accepted by the Governing Council of the Cat Fancy and the Fédération Internationale Féline.

Scottish Folds
Scottish Folds



Photo Gallery - Feline

Click here for Slideshow. You can also click on any of the photos to start slideshow.






Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™