Agriculture
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Middle school science adventures
Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Amphibians
Toads
Salamanders and Newts
Bullfrogs
Animals
Hearing Whales
Who's Knocking?
Insect Stowaways
Behavior
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Hitting the redo button on evolution
A Recipe for Happiness
Birds
Lovebirds
Finches
Quails
Chemistry and Materials
The hungry blob at the edge of the universe
Smelly Traps for Lampreys
Sticking Around with Gecko Tape
Computers
Games with a Purpose
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Electronic Paper Turns a Page
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Did Dinosaurs Do Handstands?
A Dino King's Ancestor
An Ancient Feathered Biplane
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Sky Dust Keeps Falling on Your Head
Quick Quake Alerts
Farms sprout in cities
Environment
Seabirds Deliver Arctic Pollutants
Bald Eagles Forever
Swimming with Sharks and Stingrays
Finding the Past
Traces of Ancient Campfires
Decoding a Beverage Jar
Chicken of the Sea
Fish
Perches
Basking Sharks
Skates and Rays
Food and Nutrition
Symbols from the Stone Age
Eat Out, Eat Smart
The mercury in that tuna
GSAT English Rules
Pronouns
Subject and Verb Agreement
Whoever vs. Whomever
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Mathematics
Math of the World
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Human Body
Hey batter, wake up!
A Fix for Injured Knees
Nature's Medicines
Invertebrates
Bedbugs
Earthworms
Flies
Mammals
Seal
African Zebra
Humpback Whales
Parents
Children and Media
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
How children learn
Physics
Strange Universe: The Stuff of Darkness
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Electric Backpack
Plants
Getting the dirt on carbon
Springing forward
Nature's Alphabet
Reptiles
Boa Constrictors
Iguanas
Lizards
Space and Astronomy
Ready, Set, Supernova
Holes in Martian moon mystery
Dark Galaxy
Technology and Engineering
Machine Copy
Bionic Bacteria
Weaving with Light
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
What is a Noun
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Middle school science adventures
How to Fly Like a Bat
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Weather
A Change in Climate
Recipe for a Hurricane
Warmest Year on Record
Add your Article

Salamanders

Salamander is the common name applied to approximately 500 amphibian vertebrates with slender bodies, short legs, and long tails (order Caudata or Urodela). The moist skin of the amphibians limits them to habitats either near water or under some protection on moist ground, usually in a forest. Salamanders superficially resemble lizards, but are easily distinguished by their lack of scales. Switching from swimming to walking, walking to swimming: Some species are aquatic throughout life, some take to the water intermittently, and some are entirely terrestrial as adults. Their ability to switch between swimming and walking makes them interesting animals to study the evolution of locomotion during vertebrate evolution. The two types of gaits have been studied using neuromechanical simulations. They are capable of regenerating lost limbs. The female members of the suborder Salamandroidea have cloacal glands in their cloacal chamber called spermathecae used to store sperm, as well as cloacal lips to pick up the male spermatophores. The suborders Cryptobranchoidea and Sirenoidea have external fertilization. The rigors of terrestrial life: Some salamanders retain their juvenile, gilled morphology but become sexually mature in a process called neoteny. The Axolotl, Ambystoma mexicanum, is a textbook example of a neotenic salamander, although there are many more neotenic species within the Ambystoma species complex. The juvenile form is retained to avoid the rigors of terrestrial life. Most tiny, some huge: Species of salamanders are numerous and found in most moist or aqueous habitats in the northern hemisphere. Most are small but some reach up to 5 feet in length. They live in brooks and ponds and other moist locations. North America has the hellbender and the mudpuppy which can reach the length of a foot or more. In Japan and China the giant salamander is found, which reaches 5 feet (1.5m) and weighs up to 30 kilograms]. Hanging in the Northern Hemisphere: Salamander habitat is generally restricted to mostly the northern hemisphere, with the exception of a few species living in the northernmost part of South America. Although common on the European mainland, salamanders are not a native species of either Great Britain or Ireland.

Salamanders
Salamanders








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™