Agriculture
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Springing forward
Got Milk? How?
Amphibians
Toads
Salamanders and Newts
Bullfrogs
Animals
Cannibal Crickets
Firefly Delight
Stunts for High-Diving Ants
Behavior
Monkeys in the Mirror
Baby Talk
Bringing fish back up to size
Birds
Robins
Kingfishers
Condors
Chemistry and Materials
Earth from the inside out
Moon Crash, Splash
Atomic Drive
Computers
Computers with Attitude
Small but WISE
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Downsized Dinosaurs
Big Fish in Ancient Waters
An Ancient Feathered Biplane
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Petrified Lightning
Slower Growth, Greater Warmth
A Dire Shortage of Water
Environment
A Stormy History
Bald Eagles Forever
Where rivers run uphill
Finding the Past
Decoding a Beverage Jar
Salt and Early Civilization
Words of the Distant Past
Fish
Parrotfish
Manta Rays
Nurse Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
The mercury in that tuna
Chocolate Rules
GSAT English Rules
Capitalization Rules
Who vs. Whom
Problems with Prepositions
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
Prime Time for Cicadas
Monkeys Count
Human Body
From Stem Cell to Any Cell
Attacking Asthma
The tell-tale bacteria
Invertebrates
Cockroaches
Krill
Horseshoe Crabs
Mammals
African Zebra
Canines
Weasels
Parents
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Children and Media
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Physics
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Invisibility Ring
Road Bumps
Plants
White fuzzy mold not as friendly as it looks
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
Nature's Alphabet
Reptiles
Reptiles
Crocodiles
Snakes
Space and Astronomy
A Dead Star's Dusty Ring
Unveiling Titan
Older Stars, New Age for the Universe
Technology and Engineering
Shape Shifting
Model Plane Flies the Atlantic
Crime Lab
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
Problems with Prepositions
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Robots on a Rocky Road
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Revving Up Green Machines
Weather
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Warmest Year on Record
Recipe for a Hurricane
Add your Article

Salamanders

Salamander is the common name applied to approximately 500 amphibian vertebrates with slender bodies, short legs, and long tails (order Caudata or Urodela). The moist skin of the amphibians limits them to habitats either near water or under some protection on moist ground, usually in a forest. Salamanders superficially resemble lizards, but are easily distinguished by their lack of scales. Switching from swimming to walking, walking to swimming: Some species are aquatic throughout life, some take to the water intermittently, and some are entirely terrestrial as adults. Their ability to switch between swimming and walking makes them interesting animals to study the evolution of locomotion during vertebrate evolution. The two types of gaits have been studied using neuromechanical simulations. They are capable of regenerating lost limbs. The female members of the suborder Salamandroidea have cloacal glands in their cloacal chamber called spermathecae used to store sperm, as well as cloacal lips to pick up the male spermatophores. The suborders Cryptobranchoidea and Sirenoidea have external fertilization. The rigors of terrestrial life: Some salamanders retain their juvenile, gilled morphology but become sexually mature in a process called neoteny. The Axolotl, Ambystoma mexicanum, is a textbook example of a neotenic salamander, although there are many more neotenic species within the Ambystoma species complex. The juvenile form is retained to avoid the rigors of terrestrial life. Most tiny, some huge: Species of salamanders are numerous and found in most moist or aqueous habitats in the northern hemisphere. Most are small but some reach up to 5 feet in length. They live in brooks and ponds and other moist locations. North America has the hellbender and the mudpuppy which can reach the length of a foot or more. In Japan and China the giant salamander is found, which reaches 5 feet (1.5m) and weighs up to 30 kilograms]. Hanging in the Northern Hemisphere: Salamander habitat is generally restricted to mostly the northern hemisphere, with the exception of a few species living in the northernmost part of South America. Although common on the European mainland, salamanders are not a native species of either Great Britain or Ireland.

Salamanders
Salamanders








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™