Agriculture
Getting the dirt on carbon
Silk’s superpowers
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Amphibians
Tree Frogs
Frogs and Toads
Toads
Animals
How to Fly Like a Bat
Vent Worms Like It Hot
Insect Stowaways
Behavior
Storing Memories before Bedtime
Girls are cool for school
A Recipe for Happiness
Birds
Ibises
Flamingos
Pigeons
Chemistry and Materials
Gooey Secrets of Mussel Power
Flytrap Machine
Atom Hauler
Computers
The Book of Life
Getting in Touch with Touch
Troubles with Hubble
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dinosaur Eggs-citement
A Big, Weird Dino
A Rainforest Trapped in Amber
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Warmest Year on Record
Detecting an Eerie Sea Glow
Shrinking Glaciers
Environment
Animal CSI or from Science Lab to Crime Lab
Little Bits of Trouble
The Wolf and the Cow
Finding the Past
Decoding a Beverage Jar
Unearthing Ancient Astronomy
Stonehenge Settlement
Fish
Mako Sharks
Manta Rays
Saltwater Fish
Food and Nutrition
Eat Out, Eat Smart
A Taste for Cheese
Chocolate Rules
GSAT English Rules
Problems with Prepositions
Order of Adjectives
Finding Subjects and Verbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Mathematics
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Math is a real brain bender
Monkeys Count
Human Body
What the appendix is good for
A Better Flu Shot
Germ Zapper
Invertebrates
Sea Anemones
Butterflies
Clams
Mammals
Mongooses
Bears
Opposum
Parents
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
How children learn
Physics
IceCube Science
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Spin, Splat, and Scramble
Plants
A Giant Flower's New Family
Bright Blooms That Glow
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Reptiles
Pythons
Reptiles
Gila Monsters
Space and Astronomy
Catching a Comet's Tail
Rover Makes Splash on Mars
Planet Hunters Nab Three More
Technology and Engineering
Space Umbrellas to Shield Earth
Squeezing Oil from Old Wells
Switchable Lenses Improve Vision
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
Problems with Prepositions
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Where rivers run uphill
Flying the Hyper Skies
Ready, unplug, drive
Weather
Arctic Melt
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Watering the Air
Add your Article

Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go

Have you noticed how gadgets are getting smaller? Cell phones, laptops, MP3 players—they're all getting slimmer and lighter. Now, researchers at the companies Philips and E Ink have taken another step toward greater convenience. It's a new type of electronic paper that displays words and pictures, just like your computer monitor. But it's as thin as a sheet of regular paper. You can roll it up, fold it, or bend it. If you drop it, don’t worry. It won't break. The electronic paper has two main layers. The top layer is a plastic film that has tiny bubbles containing two types of ink, black and white. The bottom layer contains a network of tiny electronic circuits. These circuits are made out of a special type of plastic that conducts electricity. How do these two layers work together to display a picture or words? First, the black and white inks have opposite electrical charges. When a particular voltage is applied to a bubble, the white ink rises to the top and the black ink sinks to the bottom, where you can't see it. And if a different voltage is applied, the opposite happens. The black ink rises while the white ink lays low. Applying different voltages by way of the circuitry below the ink layer organizes the ink into various patterns, such as words and pictures. By switching the voltage pattern, the electronic-paper display can change a few times per second. The scientists who developed the electronic paper claim that their version is the thinnest, most flexible yet. Previous versions of electronic paper were made with a thin sheet of glass, which was fragile and rigid. Bas Van Rens at Philips in the Netherlands says that, within a couple of years, you could be using electronic paper to check your e-mail or to surf the Internet. When you're finished, you'd roll up your sheet of e-paper and tuck it away in your back pocket.—S. McDonagh

Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go
Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™