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Polly Shouldn't Get a Cracker
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Two monkeys see a more colorful world
Swedish Rhapsody
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Screaming for Ice Cream
Earth from the inside out
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Electronic Paper Turns a Page
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Mammals in the Shadow of Dinosaurs
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E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Hints of Life in Ancient Lava
Explorer of the Extreme Deep
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The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
An Ocean View's Downside
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Making good, brown fat
GSAT English Rules
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GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
Detecting True Art
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
Math of the World
Human Body
Opening a Channel for Tasting Salt
Hey batter, wake up!
The tell-tale bacteria
Invertebrates
Leeches
Camel Spiders
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Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
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Gaining a Swift Lift
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
IceCube Science
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Bright Blooms That Glow
Fast-flying fungal spores
When Fungi and Algae Marry
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Gila Monsters
Iguanas
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Evidence of a Wet Mars
Return to Space
A Puffy Planetary Puzzle
Technology and Engineering
Crime Lab
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Switchable Lenses Improve Vision
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Verb?
Transportation
Flying the Hyper Skies
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Weather
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Either Martians or Mars has gas
Warmest Year on Record
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Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go

Have you noticed how gadgets are getting smaller? Cell phones, laptops, MP3 players—they're all getting slimmer and lighter. Now, researchers at the companies Philips and E Ink have taken another step toward greater convenience. It's a new type of electronic paper that displays words and pictures, just like your computer monitor. But it's as thin as a sheet of regular paper. You can roll it up, fold it, or bend it. If you drop it, don’t worry. It won't break. The electronic paper has two main layers. The top layer is a plastic film that has tiny bubbles containing two types of ink, black and white. The bottom layer contains a network of tiny electronic circuits. These circuits are made out of a special type of plastic that conducts electricity. How do these two layers work together to display a picture or words? First, the black and white inks have opposite electrical charges. When a particular voltage is applied to a bubble, the white ink rises to the top and the black ink sinks to the bottom, where you can't see it. And if a different voltage is applied, the opposite happens. The black ink rises while the white ink lays low. Applying different voltages by way of the circuitry below the ink layer organizes the ink into various patterns, such as words and pictures. By switching the voltage pattern, the electronic-paper display can change a few times per second. The scientists who developed the electronic paper claim that their version is the thinnest, most flexible yet. Previous versions of electronic paper were made with a thin sheet of glass, which was fragile and rigid. Bas Van Rens at Philips in the Netherlands says that, within a couple of years, you could be using electronic paper to check your e-mail or to surf the Internet. When you're finished, you'd roll up your sheet of e-paper and tuck it away in your back pocket.—S. McDonagh

Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go
Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go








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