Agriculture
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Watering the Air
Amphibians
Newts
Salamanders
Bullfrogs
Animals
Revenge of the Cowbirds
New Monkey Business
G-Tunes with a Message
Behavior
A Light Delay
The chemistry of sleeplessness
Primate Memory Showdown
Birds
Storks
Nightingales
Carnivorous Birds
Chemistry and Materials
When frog gender flips
Atom Hauler
The memory of a material
Computers
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
Graphene's superstrength
The hungry blob at the edge of the universe
Dinosaurs and Fossils
An Ancient Feathered Biplane
Dino Flesh from Fossil Bone
Ancient Critter Caught Shedding Its Skin
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Farms sprout in cities
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Environment
A 'Book' on Every Living Thing
Little Bits of Trouble
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Finding the Past
A Plankhouse Past
Prehistoric Trips to the Dentist
A Volcano's Deadly Ash
Fish
Hagfish
Marlin
Megamouth Sharks
Food and Nutrition
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
The Color of Health
Healing Honey
GSAT English Rules
Order of Adjectives
Subject and Verb Agreement
Whoever vs. Whomever
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Exam Preparation
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
Math Naturals
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Math is a real brain bender
Human Body
Nature's Medicines
Surviving Olympic Heat
Football Scrapes and Nasty Infections
Invertebrates
Arachnids
Leeches
Grasshoppers
Mammals
Sperm Whale
Great Danes
Foxes
Parents
How children learn
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
Black Hole Journey
Electric Backpack
Dreams of Floating in Space
Plants
Farms sprout in cities
Nature's Alphabet
A Change in Leaf Color
Reptiles
Black Mamba
Geckos
Crocodiles
Space and Astronomy
Ringing Saturn
Unveiling Titan
Saturn's New Moons
Technology and Engineering
A Light Delay
Young Scientists Take Flight
Spinach Power for Solar Cells
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Verb?
Pronouns
Transportation
Middle school science adventures
Charged cars that would charge
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Weather
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Earth's Poles in Peril
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
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Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go

Have you noticed how gadgets are getting smaller? Cell phones, laptops, MP3 players—they're all getting slimmer and lighter. Now, researchers at the companies Philips and E Ink have taken another step toward greater convenience. It's a new type of electronic paper that displays words and pictures, just like your computer monitor. But it's as thin as a sheet of regular paper. You can roll it up, fold it, or bend it. If you drop it, don’t worry. It won't break. The electronic paper has two main layers. The top layer is a plastic film that has tiny bubbles containing two types of ink, black and white. The bottom layer contains a network of tiny electronic circuits. These circuits are made out of a special type of plastic that conducts electricity. How do these two layers work together to display a picture or words? First, the black and white inks have opposite electrical charges. When a particular voltage is applied to a bubble, the white ink rises to the top and the black ink sinks to the bottom, where you can't see it. And if a different voltage is applied, the opposite happens. The black ink rises while the white ink lays low. Applying different voltages by way of the circuitry below the ink layer organizes the ink into various patterns, such as words and pictures. By switching the voltage pattern, the electronic-paper display can change a few times per second. The scientists who developed the electronic paper claim that their version is the thinnest, most flexible yet. Previous versions of electronic paper were made with a thin sheet of glass, which was fragile and rigid. Bas Van Rens at Philips in the Netherlands says that, within a couple of years, you could be using electronic paper to check your e-mail or to surf the Internet. When you're finished, you'd roll up your sheet of e-paper and tuck it away in your back pocket.—S. McDonagh

Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go
Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go








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