Agriculture
Got Milk? How?
Growing Healthier Tomato Plants
Watering the Air
Amphibians
Poison Dart Frogs
Salamanders and Newts
Toads
Animals
Helping the Cause of Macaws
Firefly Delight
Baboons Listen for Who's Tops
Behavior
A Global Warming Flap
Mice sense each other's fear
Longer lives for wild elephants
Birds
Crows
Backyard Birds
Parakeets
Chemistry and Materials
The Incredible Shrunken Kids
Moon Crash, Splash
Sugary Survival Skill
Computers
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Two monkeys see a more colorful world
The science of disappearing
Dinosaurs and Fossils
The bug that may have killed a dinosaur
Have shell, will travel
Dino Babies
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Deep Drilling at Sea
Plastic-munching microbes
Rodent Rubbish as an Ice-Age Thermometer
Environment
Plastic Meals for Seals
Nanosponges Soak Up Pollutants
Inspired by Nature
Finding the Past
Ancient Art on the Rocks
Settling the Americas
An Ancient Childhood
Fish
Sturgeons
Electric Catfish
A Jellyfish's Blurry View
Food and Nutrition
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
The Color of Health
Eat Out, Eat Smart
GSAT English Rules
Pronouns
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Problems with Prepositions
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
GSAT Exam Preparation
Mastering The GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Mathematics
Play for Science
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Human Body
Spitting Up Blobs to Get Around
Tapeworms and Drug Delivery
Disease Detectives
Invertebrates
Crawfish
Sea Urchin
Krill
Mammals
Otters
Blue Whales
Goats
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
Road Bumps
The Particle Zoo
Electric Backpack
Plants
Fungus Hunt
Bright Blooms That Glow
Surprise Visitor
Reptiles
Caimans
Turtles
Gila Monsters
Space and Astronomy
Killers from Outer Space
Saturn's New Moons
A Star's Belt of Dust and Rocks
Technology and Engineering
Weaving with Light
Reach for the Sky
Beyond Bar Codes
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
Pronouns
Problems with Prepositions
Transportation
Robots on the Road, Again
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Weather
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Warmest Year on Record
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
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Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go

Have you noticed how gadgets are getting smaller? Cell phones, laptops, MP3 players—they're all getting slimmer and lighter. Now, researchers at the companies Philips and E Ink have taken another step toward greater convenience. It's a new type of electronic paper that displays words and pictures, just like your computer monitor. But it's as thin as a sheet of regular paper. You can roll it up, fold it, or bend it. If you drop it, don’t worry. It won't break. The electronic paper has two main layers. The top layer is a plastic film that has tiny bubbles containing two types of ink, black and white. The bottom layer contains a network of tiny electronic circuits. These circuits are made out of a special type of plastic that conducts electricity. How do these two layers work together to display a picture or words? First, the black and white inks have opposite electrical charges. When a particular voltage is applied to a bubble, the white ink rises to the top and the black ink sinks to the bottom, where you can't see it. And if a different voltage is applied, the opposite happens. The black ink rises while the white ink lays low. Applying different voltages by way of the circuitry below the ink layer organizes the ink into various patterns, such as words and pictures. By switching the voltage pattern, the electronic-paper display can change a few times per second. The scientists who developed the electronic paper claim that their version is the thinnest, most flexible yet. Previous versions of electronic paper were made with a thin sheet of glass, which was fragile and rigid. Bas Van Rens at Philips in the Netherlands says that, within a couple of years, you could be using electronic paper to check your e-mail or to surf the Internet. When you're finished, you'd roll up your sheet of e-paper and tuck it away in your back pocket.—S. McDonagh

Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go
Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go








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