Agriculture
Flush-Free Fertilizer
Treating peanut allergy bit by bit
Making the most of a meal
Amphibians
Tree Frogs
Bullfrogs
Salamanders and Newts
Animals
Feeding School for Meerkats
Baboons Listen for Who's Tops
Mouse Songs
Behavior
Talking with Hands
Pondering the puzzling platypus
Island of Hope
Birds
Pelicans
Woodpecker
Kiwis
Chemistry and Materials
Sticking Around with Gecko Tape
Cold, colder and coldest ice
The Buzz about Caffeine
Computers
New twists for phantom limbs
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Getting in Touch with Touch
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Some Dinos Dined on Grass
From Mammoth to Modern Elephant
Meet the new dinos
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Getting the dirt on carbon
Coral Islands Survive a Tsunami
Earth Rocks On
Environment
Out in the Cold
Indoor ozone stopper
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Finding the Past
Prehistoric Trips to the Dentist
If Only Bones Could Speak
Decoding a Beverage Jar
Fish
Flounder
Tilapia
Sharks
Food and Nutrition
How Super Are Superfruits?
Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Adjectives and Adverbs
Pronouns
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Scholarship
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Mathematics
Detecting True Art
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Human Body
The tell-tale bacteria
A Better Flu Shot
Opening a Channel for Tasting Salt
Invertebrates
Oysters
Fleas
Arachnids
Mammals
Raccoons
Humans
Donkeys
Parents
How children learn
Children and Media
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
IceCube Science
Project Music
Plants
Plants Travel Wind Highways
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Springing forward
Reptiles
Sea Turtles
Crocodiles
Turtles
Space and Astronomy
A Puffy Planetary Puzzle
A Moon's Icy Spray
Galaxies Divide Sharply Along Color Lines
Technology and Engineering
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Smart Windows
Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go
The Parts of Speech
Problems with Prepositions
Adjectives and Adverbs
Pronouns
Transportation
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Troubles with Hubble
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Weather
Warmest Year on Record
Earth's Poles in Peril
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Add your Article

Riding to Earth's Core

Ever wonder what you’d find if you could travel to the center of the earth? Someday, we might find out, says geophysicist David Stevenson of the California Institute of Technology. Stevenson has thought up a way to send a probe to Earth’s core. For now, his plan is mostly just a cool idea. Quite a few obstacles keep it from being practical. So far, the deepest anyone has drilled into the earth is 10 kilometers. The hard crust of continents probably goes down at least another 200 kilometers. Below that lies a gooey layer called the mantle, which surrounds a liquid outer core and a solid inner core. Both inner layers are made mostly of iron. Stevenson's idea is to blast a hole 300 meters deep and 10 centimeters wide. Into the hole, he would pour melted iron, which would flow downward and create enough pressure to push the crack to Earth's center. He estimates it would take the probe about a week to get there. Blasting a big enough crack would take about the same amount of energy as that contained in a basic hydrogen bomb. The biggest challenge would be building the probe. The center of the earth gets so hot and there is so much pressure that most metals would melt. Electronic equipment would fall apart. If scientists can ever find a way around those obstacles, they might get a new view of some of Earth's deepest secrets.—E. Sohn

Riding to Earth's Core
Riding to Earth's Core








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™