Agriculture
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Microbes at the Gas Pump
Watching out for vultures
Amphibians
Salamanders
Salamanders and Newts
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Moss Echoes of Hunting
A Fallout Feast for Crabs
Pothole Repair, Insect-style
Behavior
Internet Generation
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Newly named fish crawls and hops
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Chemistry and Materials
Cooking Up Superhard Diamonds
Fog Buster
Putting the Squeeze on Toothpaste
Computers
A Classroom of the Mind
The hungry blob at the edge of the universe
Batteries built by Viruses
Dinosaurs and Fossils
An Ancient Feathered Biplane
Dino Bite Leaves a Tooth
Dinosaurs Grow Up
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Results of GSAT are in schools this week
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2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Hot Summers, Wild Fires
Earth Rocks On
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Fishing for Fun Takes Toll
Saving Wetlands
The Birds are Falling
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Words of the Distant Past
Meet your mysterious relative
Big Woman of the Distant Past
Fish
Sharks
Skates and Rays
Swordfish
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The Color of Health
The Essence of Celery
Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
GSAT English Rules
Order of Adjectives
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Who vs. That vs. Which
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Mastering The GSAT Exam
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics
A Sweet Advance in Candy Packing
Detecting True Art
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
Human Body
A Better Flu Shot
Hear, Hear
Smiles Turn Away Colds
Invertebrates
Ticks
Crustaceans
Tarantula
Mammals
Pitbulls
Narwhals
Dolphins
Parents
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Physics
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Gaining a Swift Lift
Plants
Springing forward
Fungus Hunt
Underwater Jungles
Reptiles
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Cobras
Snakes
Space and Astronomy
Evidence of a Wet Mars
Baby Star
Tossing Out a Black Hole Life Preserver
Technology and Engineering
Musclebots Take Some Steps
Young Scientists Take Flight
A Clean Getaway
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Preposition?
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Middle school science adventures
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Weather
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Catching Some Rays
Recipe for a Hurricane
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Return of the Lost Limbs

When people lose legs after accidents or illnesses, emergency care and artificial limbs often allow them to walk again. But salamanders and newts in the same situation don't need doctors or artificial body parts. They can grow limbs back on their own. Scientists have known for a long time that certain animals can regenerate limbs, but they haven't quite figured out how these creatures do it. Researchers from University College London have now come up with some new insights. Their work may lead to breakthroughs that could eventually enable people, too, to regrow lost limbs. The researchers started with two simple observations: When you cut off a newt's leg at the ankle, only the foot grows back. If you cut off a leg at the base, the whole leg grows back. In both cases, the regrowth begins with stem cells . Stem cells are unspecialized cells that can develop into nearly any type of cell in the body. But how do a newt's stem cells know when to regrow only a foot and when to regrow an entire leg? This question relates to another mystery: In newts, a severed leg will grow back only if the bundle of nerves in it also grows back. But if something prevents the nerve bundle from growing, the stem cells at the site of the wound won't multiply to produce a new leg. In its study, the British team zeroed in on a protein called nAG. When the team prevented nerves in a limb from growing, but added the nAG protein to stem cells in the limb, the limb still regrew. The scientists suspect that nerves in the stub of a limb signal the release of the nAG protein. That protein seems to guide limb regrowth. People and other mammals have proteins that are similar to nAG. Further research into these compounds may some day help human limbs and organs heal themselves.—Emily Sohn

Return of the Lost Limbs
Return of the Lost Limbs








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