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A Fallout Feast for Crabs
Putting a Mouse on Pause
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Two monkeys see a more colorful world
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Homework blues
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A Light Delay
Nanomagnets Corral Oil
The Incredible Shrunken Kids
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Look into My Eyes
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The Paleontologist and the Three Dinosaurs
Ancient Critter Caught Shedding Its Skin
Meet your mysterious relative
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Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
What is groundwater
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Recipe for a Hurricane
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Animal CSI or from Science Lab to Crime Lab
Blooming Jellies
A Vulture's Hidden Enemy
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Ancient Art on the Rocks
A Plankhouse Past
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Great White Shark
A Jellyfish's Blurry View
Food and Nutrition
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
Symbols from the Stone Age
The mercury in that tuna
GSAT English Rules
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Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
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GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Mathematics
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Math of the World
Deep-space dancers
Human Body
Remembering Facts and Feelings
Hey batter, wake up!
Nature's Medicines
Invertebrates
Termites
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Invertebrates
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Bears
Opposum
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Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Black Hole Journey
Dreams of Floating in Space
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Plants
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
The algae invasion
Bright Blooms That Glow
Reptiles
Black Mamba
Copperhead Snakes
Alligators
Space and Astronomy
Pluto, plutoid: What's in a name?
A Very Distant Planet Says "Cheese"
Gravity Tractor as Asteroid Mover
Technology and Engineering
Searching for Alien Life
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Switchable Lenses Improve Vision
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Reach for the Sky
Where rivers run uphill
How to Fly Like a Bat
Weather
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
Either Martians or Mars has gas
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Return of the Lost Limbs

When people lose legs after accidents or illnesses, emergency care and artificial limbs often allow them to walk again. But salamanders and newts in the same situation don't need doctors or artificial body parts. They can grow limbs back on their own. Scientists have known for a long time that certain animals can regenerate limbs, but they haven't quite figured out how these creatures do it. Researchers from University College London have now come up with some new insights. Their work may lead to breakthroughs that could eventually enable people, too, to regrow lost limbs. The researchers started with two simple observations: When you cut off a newt's leg at the ankle, only the foot grows back. If you cut off a leg at the base, the whole leg grows back. In both cases, the regrowth begins with stem cells . Stem cells are unspecialized cells that can develop into nearly any type of cell in the body. But how do a newt's stem cells know when to regrow only a foot and when to regrow an entire leg? This question relates to another mystery: In newts, a severed leg will grow back only if the bundle of nerves in it also grows back. But if something prevents the nerve bundle from growing, the stem cells at the site of the wound won't multiply to produce a new leg. In its study, the British team zeroed in on a protein called nAG. When the team prevented nerves in a limb from growing, but added the nAG protein to stem cells in the limb, the limb still regrew. The scientists suspect that nerves in the stub of a limb signal the release of the nAG protein. That protein seems to guide limb regrowth. People and other mammals have proteins that are similar to nAG. Further research into these compounds may some day help human limbs and organs heal themselves.—Emily Sohn

Return of the Lost Limbs
Return of the Lost Limbs








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