Agriculture
Treating peanut allergy bit by bit
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Watering the Air
Amphibians
Salamanders
Salamanders and Newts
Newts
Animals
Polly Shouldn't Get a Cracker
Big Squid
Gliders in the Family
Behavior
The nerve of one animal
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Copycat Monkeys
Birds
Eagles
Cranes
Mockingbirds
Chemistry and Materials
Flytrap Machine
Scientist Profile: Wally Gilbert
Butterfly Wings and Waterproof Coats
Computers
It's a Small E-mail World After All
Look into My Eyes
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Early Birds Ready to Rumble
The man who rocked biology to its core
Meet your mysterious relative
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Arctic Algae Show Climate Change
A Global Warming Flap
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Environment
What is groundwater
Shrimpy Invaders
Missing Tigers in India
Finding the Past
An Ancient Childhood
Watching deep-space fireworks
Ancient Cave Behavior
Fish
Basking Sharks
Skates and Rays
Carp
Food and Nutrition
Chocolate Rules
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
The Color of Health
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Adjectives and Adverbs
Finding Subjects and Verbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Mathematics
Monkeys Count
Detecting True Art
Play for Science
Human Body
Sleeping Soundly for a Longer Life
Tapeworms and Drug Delivery
What the appendix is good for
Invertebrates
Octopuses
Oysters
Centipedes
Mammals
Otters
Giant Panda
Chinchillas
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
IceCube Science
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
Dreams of Floating in Space
Plants
Bright Blooms That Glow
Nature's Alphabet
The algae invasion
Reptiles
Iguanas
Snapping Turtles
Geckos
Space and Astronomy
Galaxies Divide Sharply Along Color Lines
Witnessing a Rare Venus Eclipse
Saturn's New Moons
Technology and Engineering
Switchable Lenses Improve Vision
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Supersuits for Superheroes
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Charged cars that would charge
Middle school science adventures
Ready, unplug, drive
Weather
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Either Martians or Mars has gas
A Change in Climate
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Remembering Facts and Feelings

Can you describe everything you did last weekend, but you can't remember a thing from last year's social studies class? The difference may be all in your head. New studies pinpoint an inner-brain region called the hippocampus as the root of memory for both experiences and facts. Researchers have disagreed, however, about which kind of information the hippocampus remembers best. In a recent journal, scientists led by Larry R. Squire of the University of California, San Diego, described six adults with hippocampus damage. In one study, the six patients and 14 healthy adults read a list of names-some famous, some made up. The healthy-brained adults were able to pick out the famous people and say which ones were still alive. The brain-damaged patients remembered little about people who became famous after they suffered their injuries or in the 10 years before those injuries. In a second study, the six brain-damaged patients could remember events from their childhood just as well as 25 healthy adults. But personal memories slacked off in the years just before and after their injuries. Together, the two studies suggest that the hippocampus controls memories of both facts and events. The hippocampus may not be essential for kids' ability to remember facts, though. One study of hippocampus-damaged children showed that they could retain new facts well enough to do okay in school. This might be because kids' brains are able to reorganize themselves a lot. Still, no matter how healthy your hippocampus may be, there's no excuse to stop studying for your social studies tests!—E. Sohn

Remembering Facts and Feelings
Remembering Facts and Feelings








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