Agriculture
Fast-flying fungal spores
Making the most of a meal
Watching out for vultures
Amphibians
Salamanders and Newts
Newts
Frogs and Toads
Animals
A Tongue and a Half
Monkeys Count
Cacophony Acoustics
Behavior
Chimpanzee Hunting Tools
World’s largest lizard is venomous too
Baby Number Whizzes
Birds
Macaws
Nightingales
Doves
Chemistry and Materials
When frog gender flips
Gooey Secrets of Mussel Power
Pencil Thin
Computers
Play for Science
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
The science of disappearing
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Fossil Forests
Tiny Pterodactyl
Watery Fate for Nature's Gliders
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Unnatural Disasters
Surf Watch
Weird, new ant
Environment
A Change in Time
What is groundwater
To Catch a Dragonfly
Finding the Past
Chicken of the Sea
Untangling Human Origins
A Long Haul
Fish
Skates and Rays
Codfish
Pygmy Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Yummy bugs
The mercury in that tuna
Chocolate Rules
GSAT English Rules
Adjectives and Adverbs
Who vs. Whom
Order of Adjectives
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
It's a Math World for Animals
Setting a Prime Number Record
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Human Body
Sea Kids See Clearly Underwater
Music in the Brain
From Stem Cell to Any Cell
Invertebrates
Insects
Giant Clam
Sea Anemones
Mammals
Goats
Elk
Gray Whale
Parents
How children learn
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Physics
Einstein's Skateboard
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Strange Universe: The Stuff of Darkness
Plants
Stalking Plants by Scent
City Trees Beat Country Trees
White fuzzy mold not as friendly as it looks
Reptiles
Iguanas
Sea Turtles
Crocodilians
Space and Astronomy
Cool as a Jupiter
Holes in Martian moon mystery
An Earthlike Planet
Technology and Engineering
Riding Sunlight
Reach for the Sky
Supersuits for Superheroes
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
Adjectives and Adverbs
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Middle school science adventures
Flying the Hyper Skies
Weather
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Add your Article

Quolls

Quolls or native cats (genus Dasyurus) are carnivorous marsupials, native to Australia and Papua New Guinea. Adults are between 25 and 75 cm long, with hairy tails about 20-35 cm long. Sizes and Scales: The Northern Quoll is the smallest of the four Australian quoll species. Females are smaller than males with adult females weighing between 350-690g and adult males 540-1120g. Head and body length ranges from 270-370mm (adult males) to 249-310 (adult females). Tail length ranges between 202-345mm. Single Mothers: A remarkable feature of this species is that the males show complete die-off after mating, leaving the females to raise the young alone. What's For Dinner? Northern Quolls feed primarily on invertebrates, but also consume fleshy fruit, and a wide range of vertebrates including small mammals, birds, lizards, snakes and frogs. They also scavenge on road-kills, around campsites and in garbage tins. Just the Facts: Females have six to eight nipples and develop a pouch—which opens towards the tail—only during the breeding season, when they are rearing young. Quolls live both in forests and in open valley land. Though primarily ground-dwelling, they have developed secondary arboreal characteristics. Their molars and canines are strongly developed. GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 The Tiger Quoll (Dasyurus maculatus), also known as the Spotted-tail Quoll and the Spotted Quoll, is a carnivorous marsupial mammal, native to Australia. It is mainland Australia's largest carnivorous marsupial. Weight and Measures: The Tiger Quoll ranges from 35 to 75 cm in length and has a tail of about 34 to 50 cm. Females are smaller than the males: while females grow to four kilograms, males can reach up to 7 kg. Quolls have thick, soft fawn, brown or black fur. Small white spots cover the body except for the bushy tail, which may have a white tip. A Day in the Life: Quolls feed on a large range of prey including birds, rats and other marsupials, small reptiles and insects. They are good climbers but spend most of their time on the forest floor. Although nocturnal, they spend the daylight hours basking in the sun. They nest in rocky banks, hollow logs or small caves. They produce one litter a year with four to six young. The gestation period is 21 days. The young remain in their mother's pouch for about seven weeks, and it takes some 18 weeks for them to become independent of the mother. Sexual maturity is reached after one year. Tiger Quolls can get 4 to 5 years old.










Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™