Agriculture
Fast-flying fungal spores
Getting the dirt on carbon
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Amphibians
Salamanders and Newts
Bullfrogs
Toads
Animals
Who's Knocking?
A Sense of Danger
Moss Echoes of Hunting
Behavior
Contemplating thought
Talking with Hands
World’s largest lizard is venomous too
Birds
Geese
Ducks
Chicken
Chemistry and Materials
Putting the Squeeze on Toothpaste
Boosting Fuel Cells
Scientist Profile: Wally Gilbert
Computers
Two monkeys see a more colorful world
A Classroom of the Mind
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Meet the new dinos
Dino Takeout for Mammals
Dino-bite!
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Salty, Old and, Perhaps, a Sign of Early Life
Ice Age Melting and Rising Seas
Slower Growth, Greater Warmth
Environment
Swimming with Sharks and Stingrays
The Wolf and the Cow
What is groundwater
Finding the Past
Salt and Early Civilization
Prehistoric Trips to the Dentist
Ancient Art on the Rocks
Fish
Eels
Trout
Mako Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Sponges' secret weapon
Eat Out, Eat Smart
Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Who vs. Whom
Capitalization Rules
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Mathematics
Deep-space dancers
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Human Body
Nature's Medicines
Electricity's Spark of Life
Spit Power
Invertebrates
Earthworms
Fleas
Centipedes
Mammals
Pomeranians
Bandicoot
Persian Cats
Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
How children learn
Physics
The Particle Zoo
One ring around them all
Road Bumps
Plants
A Change in Leaf Color
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Getting the dirt on carbon
Reptiles
Boa Constrictors
Pythons
Garter Snakes
Space and Astronomy
Holes in Martian moon mystery
A Smashing Display
Saturn's New Moons
Technology and Engineering
Slip Sliming Away
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Young Scientists Take Flight
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
What is a Verb?
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Where rivers run uphill
Troubles with Hubble
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Weather
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
A Change in Climate
Warmest Year on Record
Add your Article

Quolls

Quolls or native cats (genus Dasyurus) are carnivorous marsupials, native to Australia and Papua New Guinea. Adults are between 25 and 75 cm long, with hairy tails about 20-35 cm long. Sizes and Scales: The Northern Quoll is the smallest of the four Australian quoll species. Females are smaller than males with adult females weighing between 350-690g and adult males 540-1120g. Head and body length ranges from 270-370mm (adult males) to 249-310 (adult females). Tail length ranges between 202-345mm. Single Mothers: A remarkable feature of this species is that the males show complete die-off after mating, leaving the females to raise the young alone. What's For Dinner? Northern Quolls feed primarily on invertebrates, but also consume fleshy fruit, and a wide range of vertebrates including small mammals, birds, lizards, snakes and frogs. They also scavenge on road-kills, around campsites and in garbage tins. Just the Facts: Females have six to eight nipples and develop a pouch—which opens towards the tail—only during the breeding season, when they are rearing young. Quolls live both in forests and in open valley land. Though primarily ground-dwelling, they have developed secondary arboreal characteristics. Their molars and canines are strongly developed. GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 The Tiger Quoll (Dasyurus maculatus), also known as the Spotted-tail Quoll and the Spotted Quoll, is a carnivorous marsupial mammal, native to Australia. It is mainland Australia's largest carnivorous marsupial. Weight and Measures: The Tiger Quoll ranges from 35 to 75 cm in length and has a tail of about 34 to 50 cm. Females are smaller than the males: while females grow to four kilograms, males can reach up to 7 kg. Quolls have thick, soft fawn, brown or black fur. Small white spots cover the body except for the bushy tail, which may have a white tip. A Day in the Life: Quolls feed on a large range of prey including birds, rats and other marsupials, small reptiles and insects. They are good climbers but spend most of their time on the forest floor. Although nocturnal, they spend the daylight hours basking in the sun. They nest in rocky banks, hollow logs or small caves. They produce one litter a year with four to six young. The gestation period is 21 days. The young remain in their mother's pouch for about seven weeks, and it takes some 18 weeks for them to become independent of the mother. Sexual maturity is reached after one year. Tiger Quolls can get 4 to 5 years old.










Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™