Agriculture
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Microbes at the Gas Pump
Flush-Free Fertilizer
Amphibians
Frogs and Toads
Newts
Poison Dart Frogs
Animals
A Butterfly's New Green Glow
Moss Echoes of Hunting
Vampire Bats on the Run
Behavior
How Much Babies Know
Bringing fish back up to size
The Colorful World of Synesthesia
Birds
Roadrunners
Storks
Swifts
Chemistry and Materials
Sweeeet! The Skinny on Sugar Substitutes
These gems make their own way
Music of the Future
Computers
A Classroom of the Mind
A New Look at Saturn's rings
Middle school science adventures
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dino Takeout for Mammals
Message in a dinosaur's teeth
Three strikes wiped out woolly mammoths
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Earth's Poles in Peril
Petrified Lightning
Environment
Plastic Meals for Seals
Ready, unplug, drive
A Stormy History
Finding the Past
The Taming of the Cat
Words of the Distant Past
Of Lice and Old Clothes
Fish
Tiger Sharks
Codfish
Flounder
Food and Nutrition
Chew for Health
Making good, brown fat
Food for Life
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Adjectives and Adverbs
Who vs. That vs. Which
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Mathematics
Prime Time for Cicadas
A Sweet Advance in Candy Packing
Math Naturals
Human Body
Spitting Up Blobs to Get Around
Germ Zapper
A Fix for Injured Knees
Invertebrates
Wasps
Mussels
Lobsters
Mammals
African Warthogs
Elk
Otters
Parents
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
How children learn
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
Electric Backpack
Dreams of Floating in Space
The Particle Zoo
Plants
City Trees Beat Country Trees
The algae invasion
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
Reptiles
Anacondas
Crocodiles
Komodo Dragons
Space and Astronomy
Supernovas Shed Light on Dark Energy
Roving the Red Planet
Mercury's magnetic twisters
Technology and Engineering
A Satellite of Your Own
Searching for Alien Life
Supersuits for Superheroes
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
What is a Verb?
What is a Noun
Transportation
Robots on the Road, Again
Charged cars that would charge
Reach for the Sky
Weather
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
A Dire Shortage of Water
A Change in Climate
Add your Article

Pronouns

Definition:

A pronoun is a word that takes the place of a noun. Pronouns can be in one of three cases: Subject, Object, or Possessive.

Rule 1

Subject pronouns are used when the pronoun is the subject of the sentence. You can remember subject pronouns easily by filling in the blank subject space for a simple sentence.

Example:
______ did the job.
I, you, he, she, it, we, and they all fit into the blank and are, therefore, subject pronouns.

Rule 2

Subject pronouns are also used if they rename the subject. They follow to be verbs such asis, are, was, were, am, and will be.

Examples:
It is he.
This is she speaking.
It is we who are responsible for the decision to downsize.

NOTE: In spoken English, most people tend to follow to be verbs with object pronouns. Many English teachers support (or at least have given in to) this distinction between written and spoken English.

Example:
It could have been them.

Better:
It could have been they.

Example:
It is just me at the door.

Better:
It is just I at the door.

Rule 3

Object pronouns are used everywhere else (direct object, indirect object, object of the preposition). Object pronouns are me, you, him, her, it, us, and them.

Examples:
Jean talked to him.
Are you talking to me?

To be able to choose pronouns correctly, you must learn to identify clauses. A clause is a group of words containing a verb and subject.

Rule 4a

A strong clause can stand on its own.

Examples:
She is hungry.
I am feeling well today.

Rule 4b

A weak clause begins with words such as although, since, if, when, and because. Weak clauses cannot stand on their own.

Examples:
Although she is hungry...
If she is hungry...
Since I am feeling well...

Rule 4c

If a sentence contains more than one clause, isolate the clauses so that you can decide which pronoun is correct.

Examples:

Weak

Strong

[Although she is hungry,]

[she will give him some of her food.]

[Although this gift is for him,]

[I would like you to have it too.]

Rule 5

To decide whether to use the subject or object pronoun after the words than or as, mentally complete the sentence.

Examples:
Tranh is as smart as she/her.
If we mentally complete the sentence, we would say, "Tranh is as smart as she is." Therefore, she is the correct answer.

Zoe is taller than I/me.
Mentally completing the sentence, we have, "Zoe is taller than I am."

Daniel would rather talk to her than I/me.
We can mentally complete this sentence in two ways: "Daniel would rather talk to her than to me." OR "Daniel would rather talk to her than I would." As you can see, the meaning will change depending on the pronoun you choose.

Rule 6

Possessive pronouns show ownership and never need apostrophes.
Possessive pronouns: mine, yours, his, hers, its, ours, theirs

NOTE: The only time it's has an apostrophe is when it is a contraction for it is or it has.

Examples:
It's a cold morning.
The thermometer reached its highest reading.

Rule 7

Reflexive pronouns - myself, himself, herself, itself, themselves, ourselves, yourself, yourselves- should be used only when they refer back to another word in the sentence.

Correct:
I worked myself to the bone.

Incorrect:
My brother and myself did it.
The word myself does not refer back to another word.

Correct:
My brother and I did it.

Incorrect:
Please give it to John or myself.

Correct:
Please give it to John or me.

I need more understanding


I'm ready for the quiz

Pronouns









Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™