Agriculture
Seeds of the Future
Keeping Bugs Away from Food
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Amphibians
Toads
Salamanders and Newts
Poison Dart Frogs
Animals
Fishy Sounds
Ant Invasions Change the Rules
A Fallout Feast for Crabs
Behavior
When Darwin got sick of feathers
A Global Warming Flap
Copycat Monkeys
Birds
Kingfishers
Mockingbirds
Parrots
Chemistry and Materials
The metal detector in your mouth
The Buzz about Caffeine
Silks superpowers
Computers
Getting in Touch with Touch
Nonstop Robot
The Book of Life
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dino-bite!
Meet the new dinos
Teeny Skull Reveals Ancient Ancestor
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Rocking the House
Bugs with Gas
Earth Rocks On
Environment
Plant Gas
Hazy with a Chance of Sunshine
Seabirds Deliver Arctic Pollutants
Finding the Past
Preserving Ancient Warrior Paint
Settling the Americas
Childhood's Long History
Fish
Swordfish
Mahi-Mahi
Trout
Food and Nutrition
The mercury in that tuna
Chew for Health
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
GSAT English Rules
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Pronouns
Capitalization Rules
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Tarrant High overcoming the odds
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Mathematics
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
Math of the World
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
Human Body
Taste Messenger
Running with Sneaker Science
Nature's Medicines
Invertebrates
Termites
Tarantula
Flatworms
Mammals
Walrus
African Camels
African Jackal
Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
How children learn
Children and Media
Physics
Dreams of Floating in Space
Electric Backpack
Strange Universe: The Stuff of Darkness
Plants
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Reptiles
Box Turtles
Tortoises
Copperhead Snakes
Space and Astronomy
A Family in Space
Ready, Set, Supernova
Gravity Tractor as Asteroid Mover
Technology and Engineering
Bionic Bacteria
Switchable Lenses Improve Vision
Young Scientists Take Flight
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
What is a Preposition?
What is a Noun
Transportation
Robots on the Road, Again
How to Fly Like a Bat
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Weather
Recipe for a Hurricane
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Watering the Air
Add your Article

Professor Ant

If you haven't appreciated your teachers lately, now might be a good time to reflect on all that they do for you. Good teachers already know the information that they're teaching, but they slow down to explain it to you. With their help, you learn far faster than you would on your own. And teachers take the time to listen to your questions and steer you in the right direction. One kind of ant does all of these things, too, a new study finds. It is, in fact, the first time that scientists have demonstrated true teaching in an animal other than humans. "One would have expected to see teaching in chimpanzees or [some other primate], but for the first fairly strong evidence of it to come from ants is surprising and interesting," says Bennett G. Galef Jr. of McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario. The tiny ant Temnothorax albipennis lives in small nests among the rocks on the southern coast of England. Previously, researchers had been watching how these ants go about moving to a new home. They noticed that ants that know the way either carry their buddies or run very close in front of them as guides. The guiding behavior is interesting because ants run much faster when alone or even when carrying others. In their lab, researchers from the University of Bristol in England worked with colonies of Temnothorax albipennis that had a sugar solution placed 15 centimeters (6 inches) away from their nests. The scientists filmed the colony's behavior and then spent hundreds of hours analyzing the videotape. The analyses showed that running with another ant took four times as long as running alone. So, just as teachers slow down to help you, ants were slowing down to help each other. Follower ants also tapped their antennae on the backs of the leaders, and both ants adjusted their speeds to stay together. These behaviors indicate a communication system between teacher and student, just like the questions you ask when you're confused. The student ant also sometimes stopped the guided trek to turn this way and that as if it were looking for landmarks. The true test of good teaching is whether the lessons work, and the ants passed this test with flying colors, too. With a teacher-guide, it took ants only two-thirds as long to find the sugar as it did for untaught ants to discover it on their own. Moreover, after the lesson, student ants often managed to find their own shortcuts on the way home, a sign that they had learned the neighborhood well during their guided trip to the food. And the student ants sometimes turned into teachers themselves. All this activity appears to pay off for Temnothorax albipennis. Through careful teaching, ants are able to get coworkers to a food source without having to lay down a scent trail, which might go unnoticed anyway.E. Sohn

Professor Ant
Professor Ant








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™