Agriculture
Middle school science adventures
Earth-Friendly Fabrics
Watering the Air
Amphibians
Bullfrogs
Poison Dart Frogs
Toads
Animals
Putting a Mouse on Pause
A Microbe Nanny for Young Wasps
Roboroach and Company
Behavior
Face values
Eating Troubles
Brain cells take a break
Birds
Birds We Eat
Finches
Peafowl
Chemistry and Materials
Sticking Around with Gecko Tape
Pencil Thin
Getting the dirt on carbon
Computers
A Light Delay
Fingerprint Evidence
Getting in Touch with Touch
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Have shell, will travel
Tiny Pterodactyl
Dinosaur Dig
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Coral Gardens
Island of Hope
Environment
Eating Up Foul Sewage Smells
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Hazy with a Chance of Sunshine
Finding the Past
A Long Trek to Asia
Preserving Ancient Warrior Paint
Salt and Early Civilization
Fish
Sharks
Carp
Barracudas
Food and Nutrition
A Taste for Cheese
Turning to Sweets, Fats to Calm the Brain
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Who vs. That vs. Which
Finding Subjects and Verbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Mastering The GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Mathematics
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
It's a Math World for Animals
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
Human Body
Hear, Hear
Smiles Turn Away Colds
Heart Revival
Invertebrates
Crabs
Caterpillars
Praying Mantis
Mammals
African Jackal
Basset Hounds
Siamese Cats
Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
Black Hole Journey
The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Plants
Sweet, Sticky Science
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Flower family knows its roots
Reptiles
Sea Turtles
Iguanas
Boa Constrictors
Space and Astronomy
Witnessing a Rare Venus Eclipse
Cousin Earth
Sun Flips Out to Flip-Flop
Technology and Engineering
Smart Windows
Sugar Power for Cell Phones
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
The Parts of Speech
Problems with Prepositions
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Noun
Transportation
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Charged cars that would charge
Robots on the Road, Again
Weather
Either Martians or Mars has gas
Watering the Air
A Change in Climate
Add your Article

Plant Gas

You may have never heard of methane, but there's a lot of it out there. Cows emit the gas, which is produced by bacteria in their stomachs. Methane also wafts up from the wet soils in swamps and rice paddies, where methane-producing microbes live. Now, an international team of scientists has found another, unexpected natural source of methane: plants. Previously, researchers had thought that it was impossible for plants to make significant amounts of the gas. They had assumed that microbes need to be in environments without oxygen to produce methane. Methane is a greenhouse gas, like carbon dioxide. Gases such as methane and carbon dioxide trap heat in Earth's atmosphere and contribute to global warming. In their experiments, the scientists used sealed chambers that contained the same concentration of oxygen that Earth's atmosphere has. They measured the amounts of methane that were released by both living plants and dried plant material, such as fallen leaves. With the dried plants, the researchers took measurements at temperatures ranging from 30 degrees Celsius (86 Fahrenheit) to 70 degrees C (158 F). At 30 degrees C, they found, a gram of dried material released up to 3 nanograms of methane per hour. (One nanogram is a billionth of a gram.) With every 10-degree rise in temperature, the amount of methane released each hour roughly doubled. Living plants growing at their normal temperatures released as much as 370 nanograms of methane per gram of plant tissue per hour. Methane emissions tripled when living and dead plant material was exposed to sunlight. Because there was plenty of oxygen available, it's unlikely that the types of bacteria that normally make methane were involved. Experiments on plants that were grown in water rather than soil also resulted in methane emissions. That's another strong sign that the gas came from the plants and not soil microbes. Altogether, the world's plants produce more than 150 million metric tons of methane each year, the scientists estimate. That's 20 percent of all the methane that typically enters the atmosphere. Future tests will measure how much of an impact plant-produced methane actually has on the environment.E. Sohn

Plant Gas
Plant Gas








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™