Agriculture
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Springing forward
Microbes at the Gas Pump
Amphibians
Tree Frogs
Bullfrogs
Salamanders and Newts
Animals
Life on the Down Low
Ant Invasions Change the Rules
New Monkey Business
Behavior
Mice sense each other's fear
Listen and Learn
The nerve of one animal
Birds
Storks
Pigeons
Carnivorous Birds
Chemistry and Materials
Mother-of-Pearl on Ice
Toxic Dirt + Avian Flu = Science Fair Success
Fog Buster
Computers
The Earth-bound asteroid scientists saw coming
Small but WISE
Electronic Paper Turns a Page
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Middle school science adventures
Dino-bite!
Dino Flesh from Fossil Bone
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
A Volcano Wakes Up
Snowflakes and Avalanches
Petrified Lightning
Environment
Island Extinctions
A Change in Climate
Plant Gas
Finding the Past
Ancient Art on the Rocks
Writing on eggshells
Decoding a Beverage Jar
Fish
Piranha
Tiger Sharks
Hammerhead Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Packing Fat
Symbols from the Stone Age
Making good, brown fat
GSAT English Rules
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Capitalization Rules
Order of Adjectives
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Scholarship
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics
Detecting True Art
Math of the World
Math is a real brain bender
Human Body
Nature's Medicines
Disease Detectives
A Sour Taste in Your Mouth
Invertebrates
Roundworms
Dragonflies
Bedbugs
Mammals
African Hippopotamus
African Jackal
Grizzly Bear
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
Invisibility Ring
IceCube Science
Spin, Splat, and Scramble
Plants
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
Seeds of the Future
Reptiles
Anacondas
Boa Constrictors
Snapping Turtles
Space and Astronomy
Cool as a Jupiter
A Galaxy Far, Far, Far Away
Wrong-way planets do gymnastics
Technology and Engineering
Spinach Power for Solar Cells
Squeezing Oil from Old Wells
Young Scientists Take Flight
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Noun
Transportation
Robots on the Road, Again
How to Fly Like a Bat
Where rivers run uphill
Weather
Either Martians or Mars has gas
Arctic Melt
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
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Pencil Thin

Imagine a shaving of pencil lead, the kind that might fall on your desk after you use a hand-held sharpener. Now try to imagine a pencil flake that's only one atom thickóless than 1-millionth the thickness of the shaving! Scientists have created just such a thin flake, and they're already thinking about how they can use this incredibly wispy material. Pencil lead isn't really made out of lead. Instead, it's mostly a material called graphite, which consists of many layers of carbon stacked on top of each other. By rubbing pieces of graphite against a hard surface, scientists in England and Russia have broken apart these layers and isolated super-thin sheets of carbon. They call this nanomaterial "few-layer graphene." A second group of researchers created graphene in a different way. They started with a flat, fingernail-size fleck of a hard compound containing silicon and carbon. They then heated the fleck. Silicon evaporated from the top layers of the fleck's surface. This heating left only carbon in these upper layers, and the carbon atoms rearranged themselves to form graphene. Some scientists had predicted that, if such sheets were ever made, they would naturally curl upólike a poster that won't flatten after being rolled up in a tube for a long time. Instead, it turns out the graphene can lie flat. Scientists have been creating and experimenting with nanomaterials made out of carbon for nearly 20 years now. They've created buckyballs, in which carbon atoms are arranged in a pattern like that on a soccer ball. And they've created carbon nanotubes, which are shaped like drinking straws. Graphene is the newcomer. You can think of these new graphene sheets as starting materials that can be bent and molded into structures like those of the buckyball and carbon nanotube. Researchers have already put graphene to work. They've fashioned it into a wire and found that the material can conduct electricity. In fact, scientists expect graphene to produce less heat than normal materials do when they conduct electricity. This property may prove useful for making ultrasmall electronic gadgets that don't burn themselves up. Like ants, carbon nanomaterials are amazingly strong for their tiny size. And because graphene is naturally flat, researchers propose that the sheets would be a great material to use as a tough protective coating on devices. The material could also go into sensitive sensors that would vibrate at different rates in response to different chemicals. So the next time you're using a pencil to scribble notes in class, think of the incredible possibilities of the material you're leaving behind on your sheet of paper.óK. Ramsayer

Pencil Thin
Pencil Thin








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