Agriculture
New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Treating peanut allergy bit by bit
Flush-Free Fertilizer
Amphibians
Salamanders
Toads
Tree Frogs
Animals
Mating Slows Down Prairie Dogs
Armadillo
A Spider's Taste for Blood
Behavior
Math is a real brain bender
Math Naturals
Mice sense each other's fear
Birds
Ibises
Waterfowl
Storks
Chemistry and Materials
Moon Crash, Splash
Makeup Science
Earth from the inside out
Computers
The solar system's biggest junkyard
A Classroom of the Mind
Small but WISE
Dinosaurs and Fossils
The Paleontologist and the Three Dinosaurs
Dinosaur Dig
From Mammoth to Modern Elephant
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Killer Space Rock Snuffed Out Ancient Life
Distant Quake Changes Geyser Eruptions
A Global Warming Flap
Environment
Will Climate Change Depose Monarchs?
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Shrinking Fish
Finding the Past
Writing on eggshells
A Long Trek to Asia
Little People Cause Big Surprise
Fish
Lampreys
Carp
Tuna
Food and Nutrition
Chew for Health
Recipe for Health
The Color of Health
GSAT English Rules
Pronouns
Whoever vs. Whomever
Who vs. That vs. Which
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Scholarship
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
Math Naturals
Math of the World
A Sweet Advance in Candy Packing
Human Body
Sun Screen
Cell Phone Tattlers
Nature's Medicines
Invertebrates
Tapeworms
Sponges
Black Widow spiders
Mammals
Capybaras
Gerbils
Boxers
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
How children learn
Physics
The Particle Zoo
Project Music
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Plants
Farms sprout in cities
A Giant Flower's New Family
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Reptiles
Crocodilians
Boa Constrictors
Caimans
Space and Astronomy
Unveiling Titan
Planning for Mars
An Icy Blob of Fluff
Technology and Engineering
Drawing Energy out of Wastewater
A Clean Getaway
Searching for Alien Life
The Parts of Speech
What is a Preposition?
What is a Noun
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Where rivers run uphill
Ready, unplug, drive
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Weather
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Either Martians or Mars has gas
Add your Article

One ring around them all

Astronomers recently found another ring around the planet Saturn — and it’s the biggest one yet. This newly discovered ring stretches about 15 million miles across, which makes a loop big enough to fit a billion Earths inside. It may be even bigger, say the astronomers, and reach 22 million miles across at its diameter. Saturn’s new ring is now the biggest known ring in the solar system. (The solar system includes the sun and all the planets and other objects that orbit around it.) “It’s an exciting discovery,” John Spencer told Science News. He is a scientist at the Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colo., and studies planets. Astronomers found the ring in February, but they did not find it using telescopes here on Earth. Instead, they used NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope, a spacecraft that trails Earth in an orbit about the sun and takes pictures of deep space. The Spitzer telescope does not take pictures using visible light, like most telescopes or cameras. Instead, it detects infrared energy, which is energy (like heat) which cannot be seen with the naked eye. Light travels in waves, and the waves of infrared light are shorter than the waves of visible light. Waves of energy coming from the newly discovered ring are estimated to be about 30 microns apart — so tiny that about 1,000 waves would fit on your thumb nail. This ring, like Saturn’s other rings, is not one solid piece of rock. Instead, it is made up of millions or billions of tiny rocks that orbit the planet all together and give the appearance of a unified ring. Unlike the more visible rings, however, this big one is ghostly — the pieces are far apart, and the ring cannot be seen from the surface of the Earth. If all the pieces were stuck together, they’d be slightly bigger than a rock a half-mile wide. Astronomers suspect that the newly discovered ring gets its material from Saturn’s outermost moon, Phoebe. For example, the dust in the ring circles Saturn in the same path and the same direction as Phoebe. Plus, the surface of Phoebe is marked with holes and places where rock has been knocked away, the result of collisions between Phoebe and other moons and rocks. These collisions could have sent dust out into space, to become part of the big ring. The discovery of the ring could help explain other mysteries surrounding Saturn and its dozens of moons. The moon called Iapetus, for example, is two-toned: one side is gray; the other more reddish. Iapetus is within the newly discovered ring, but it orbits in the opposite direction. As a result, some researchers say, debris from the ring may have coated and colored one side of Iapetus as it moved through space, and left the other side alone. “The cause of Iapetus' bizarre yin-yang [color] distribution … has been a nagging puzzle that now seems solved,” said Joseph Burns, a planetary scientist at Cornell University who talked about the discovery at a recent meeting of astronomers. Not everyone agrees. Spencer, for example, thinks the ring alone may not be able to explain Iapetus’ funny coloring. To know for sure, researchers will have to look harder at the ringed planet — and at the biggest ring of all. POWER WORDS infrared The range of invisible radiation with wavelengths from about 750 nanometers (just longer than red in the visible spectrum) to 1 millimeter, on the border of the microwave region telescope An arrangement of lenses or mirrors or both that gathers visible light, permitting direct observation or photographic recording of distant objects micron A unit of length equal to one millionth of a meter. moon A natural satellite orbiting around a planet.

One ring around them all
One ring around them all








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™