Agriculture
Vitamin D-licious Mushrooms
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
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Amphibians
Toads
Salamanders
Poison Dart Frogs
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Odor-Chasing Penguins
Armadillo
A Butterfly's New Green Glow
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Hitting the redo button on evolution
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Baby Talk
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Popping to Perfection
Small but WISE
Nanomagnets Corral Oil
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Supersonic Splash
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The Shape of the Internet
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The bug that may have killed a dinosaur
Hunting by Sucking, Long Ago
Did Dinosaurs Do Handstands?
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
A Volcano's Deadly Ash
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Digging into a Tsunami Disaster
Environment
A Change in Climate
Bald Eagles Forever
Ready, unplug, drive
Finding the Past
Ancient Cave Behavior
A Long Haul
Little People Cause Big Surprise
Fish
Carp
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Electric Ray
Food and Nutrition
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
Symbols from the Stone Age
The Color of Health
GSAT English Rules
Pronouns
Who vs. That vs. Which
Finding Subjects and Verbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Math is a real brain bender
Human Body
Taking the sting out of scorpion venom
Sleeping Soundly for a Longer Life
Nature's Medicines
Invertebrates
Mollusks
Scallops
Crawfish
Mammals
Narwhals
Llamas
Armadillo
Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Physics
Powering Ball Lightning
Spin, Splat, and Scramble
One ring around them all
Plants
Assembling the Tree of Life
A Change in Leaf Color
Surprise Visitor
Reptiles
Geckos
Black Mamba
Snakes
Space and Astronomy
Roving the Red Planet
Zooming In on the Wild Sun
A Planet's Slim-Fast Plan
Technology and Engineering
Spinach Power for Solar Cells
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Model Plane Flies the Atlantic
The Parts of Speech
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Verb?
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Weather
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Warmest Year on Record
A Change in Climate
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Older Stars, New Age for the Universe

The universe has been around for an extra long time. Astronomers used to estimate that the oldest stars were about 13 billion years old. New data suggest that these stars are nearly a billion years older than that. For most of its life, a star produces energy and heat by fusing hydrogen to make helium inside its core. Near the end of its life, when its hydrogen supply is running low, the star continues to convert hydrogen into helium but requires the presence of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen to do so. Two teams of scientists have now used particle accelerators—atom smashers—to mimic the conditions inside stars. By studying high-energy collisions between hydrogen nuclei (protons) and nitrogen nuclei, the researchers could check how quickly nuclear reactions inside a star proceed. Both groups, one at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the other at the National Institute for Nuclear Physics in Italy, found that the reactions occur only half as fast as had been estimated. Such a slow reaction time allows gravity to shrink a star more than it would if the reaction were faster. As a result, an elderly star looks brighter than it otherwise would. Brightness is supposed to indicate how old a star is. Now that they know how deceptive brightness can be, astronomers have had to revise their estimates of star age. In line with observations from a satellite called the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe, the universe now appears to be about 13.7 billion years old, astronomers say. That's quite a lot of time to ponder.—E. Sohn

Older Stars, New Age for the Universe
Older Stars, New Age for the Universe








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