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A Spider's Taste for Blood
Ultrasonic Frogs Raise the Pitch
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Seeing red means danger ahead
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Games with a Purpose
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A Dino King's Ancestor
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2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Ice Age Melting and Rising Seas
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
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The Oily Gulf
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Words of the Distant Past
Stone Age Sole Survivors
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A Taste for Cheese
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GSAT English Rules
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Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
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GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
Losing with Heads or Tails
Play for Science
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Human Body
Taking the sting out of scorpion venom
A Long Haul
A Sour Taste in Your Mouth
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African Wildedbeest
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Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
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Extra Strings for New Sounds
Road Bumps
Black Hole Journey
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Bright Blooms That Glow
Assembling the Tree of Life
Plants Travel Wind Highways
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Zooming In on the Wild Sun
Pluto, plutoid: What's in a name?
Big Galaxy Swallows Little Galaxy
Technology and Engineering
Dancing with Robots
Musclebots Take Some Steps
A Micro-Dose of Your Own Medicine
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
What is a Noun
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Troubles with Hubble
Flying the Hyper Skies
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Weather
Earth's Poles in Peril
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
The solar system's biggest junkyard
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Nonstop Robot

In some of the scariest science fiction scenarios, evil robots refuse to die, no matter how fiercely people fight back. Now, science fiction has edged into science fact. For the first time, researchers have created a robotic machine that can take a beating and keep on trucking. Developed by scientists from Cornell University and the University of Vermont, the new robot looks like a spider with four legs. Until now, even the most advanced robot was almost certain to break down when damaged. That's because its internal computer simply doesn't know how to operate the machine after its shape has changed. To get around this problem, the spidery robot's developers equipped their invention with eight motors and two sensors that read how the machine is tilting. The motors and sensors all provide electrical signals to the machine's software. Using this information, the system follows a new procedure to figure out the machine's shape at any given moment. The program chooses from among 100,000 possible arrangements of parts. From there, the computer considers a wide variety of possible next steps, and it calculates how best to move the robot forward the longest possible distance, before trying to move again. The new strategy is a major advance in robotics, scientists say, and it's far from scary. The technology may someday help researchers create better artificial limbs that give new freedom to people who lack arms and legs. The new knowledge might also help scientists understand how people and animals figure out their own sense of place in space. "Designing robots that can adapt to changing environments and can compensate for damage has been a difficult problem," says neuroscientist Olaf Sporns of Indiana University in Bloomington. "This work provides a new way toward solving this important problem."—E. Sohn

Nonstop Robot
Nonstop Robot








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