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Where Have All the Bees Gone?
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Got Milk? How?
Amphibians
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Bee Heat Cooks Invaders
Mouse Songs
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Fish needs see-through head
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A Butterfly's Electric Glow
The memory of a material
Sticking Around with Gecko Tape
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Nonstop Robot
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A Rainforest Trapped in Amber
Teeny Skull Reveals Ancient Ancestor
Big Fish in Ancient Waters
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Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Explorer of the Extreme Deep
Greener Diet
Wave of Destruction
Environment
Food Web Woes
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Hazy with a Chance of Sunshine
Finding the Past
Oldest Writing in the New World
Fakes in the museum
Meet your mysterious relative
Fish
White Tip Sharks
Manta Rays
Puffer Fish
Food and Nutrition
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
Allergies: From Bee Stings to Peanuts
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Capitalization Rules
Adjectives and Adverbs
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Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
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Math of the World
Human Body
Spit Power
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Cell Phone Tattlers
Invertebrates
Insects
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Mammals
Elk
African Warthogs
African Wildedbeest
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
How children learn
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The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
Black Hole Journey
Road Bumps
Plants
Bright Blooms That Glow
Sweet, Sticky Science
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
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Komodo Dragons
Space and Astronomy
Big Galaxy Swallows Little Galaxy
Sounds of Titan
Zooming In on the Wild Sun
Technology and Engineering
Supersuits for Superheroes
Weaving with Light
Space Umbrellas to Shield Earth
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Verb?
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Middle school science adventures
Where rivers run uphill
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Weather
Either Martians or Mars has gas
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Catching Some Rays
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No Fat Stars

There's a limit to how big most things can get. Some people are really tall, but no one is as tall as a house. Cats can get really fat, but there's never been a tabby as heavy as a truck. And so on. Now, astronomer Don Figer of the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore has discovered that the size of a star may have a limit, too. No stars in our galaxy, he estimates, can weigh more than 150 times the mass of our sun. This conclusion comes from observations of an area near the center of the Milky Way called the Arches cluster. The cluster is between 2 million and 2.5 million years old, and stars are still forming there. It contains about 2,000 stars. Figer thought that the Arches cluster would be a good place to search for the galaxy's biggest stars because it's still fairly young. Massive stars have short lives, so it wouldn't make sense to look at a cluster that was much older than Arches. It also wouldn't make sense to look at much younger ones because stars in young clusters are still hideen behind gas and dust. The Arches cluster was also promising because it's big. Its total mass is that of about 10,000 suns. In theory, it could hold at least 18 stars weighing more than 130 times the mass of the sun. Using the Hubble Space Telescope to gauge the weight of hundreds of stars in the Arches cluster, Figer found no stars this big. This means, he concluded, that there must be an upper limit to the size of a star—perhaps about 150 times the sun's mass. Astronomers are just beginning to understand the processes behind star birth. No one yet knows what determines the limits on their growth. Figer plans to study clusters of different ages to find out more.—E. Sohn

No Fat Stars
No Fat Stars








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