Agriculture
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Middle school science adventures
Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Amphibians
Salamanders
Salamanders and Newts
Newts
Animals
Fishy Sounds
Killer Flatworms Hunt with Poison
Fishy Cleaners
Behavior
Pipefish power from mom
Diving, Rolling, and Floating, Alligator Style
Nice Chimps
Birds
Parakeets
Birds We Eat
Mockingbirds
Chemistry and Materials
The Taste of Bubbles
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Small but WISE
Computers
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Batteries built by Viruses
Small but WISE
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Hall of Dinos
Winged Insects May Go Way Back
Dino-bite!
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Groundwater and the Water Cycle
What is groundwater
On the Trail of America's Next Top Scientists
Environment
Inspired by Nature
Power of the Wind
Pollution Detective
Finding the Past
Untangling Human Origins
Unearthing Ancient Astronomy
Traces of Ancient Campfires
Fish
Lungfish
Freshwater Fish
Parrotfish
Food and Nutrition
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
Yummy bugs
The Essence of Celery
GSAT English Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
Who vs. That vs. Which
Pronouns
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
GSAT Scholarship
Mastering The GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
Detecting True Art
Play for Science
Deep-space dancers
Human Body
Speedy Gene Gives Runners a Boost
The tell-tale bacteria
Running with Sneaker Science
Invertebrates
Squid
Walking Sticks
Worms
Mammals
Wolverines
Gerbils
Pomeranians
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Children and Media
Physics
Extra Strings for New Sounds
Black Hole Journey
Electric Backpack
Plants
Pumping Up Poison Ivy
Stalking Plants by Scent
Seeds of the Future
Reptiles
Crocodilians
Snakes
Garter Snakes
Space and Astronomy
A Dusty Birthplace
A Star's Belt of Dust and Rocks
Chaos Among the Planets
Technology and Engineering
Toy Challenge
Smart Windows
Sugar Power for Cell Phones
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Troubles with Hubble
Charged cars that would charge
Ready, unplug, drive
Weather
A Change in Climate
Warmest Year on Record
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Add your Article

Mosquito duets

A mosquito’s whining buzz can be as irritating as its bite. But to a mosquito of the opposite sex, the high-pitched hum is the sound of romance. Skeeters create their distinctive sound by beating their wings at a certain rate, or a certain number of beats per second. The wing vibrations produce sound waves that resonate in their bodies and outside, too. Now, scientists have discovered that some mosquitoes can adjust the speed of their wing beats — and change the accompanying sound — to attract a potential mate. In a recent study, male and female Aedes aegypti mosquitoes raised the pitch, or highness or lowness, of their whine when they came within earshot of the opposite sex. By matching the rate at which they beat their wings — as well as their flight tone — the love-struck skeeters were able to perform a singing duet before mating. To harmonize, the skeeters had to adjust the pitch of their whine to include a quiet tone at 1,200 hertz. This is several times higher than the skeeters’ normal hum. A single female mosquito, for example, generally hums loudest at 400 hertz. Male mosquitoes hum loudest at a tone of 600 hertz. In the study, Lauren Cator of Cornell University and her colleagues fastened mosquitoes to flexible wires, and then flew the insects past stationary, or still, mosquitoes. The researchers recorded the insects’ flight tones with a specialized microphone. As a male and female flew by each other, their flight tones fell in sync, producing a faint harmonic note that the researchers picked up. The scientists also implanted tiny electrodes in organs used for hearing in the skeeters’ antennae. The researchers found that this organ is sensitive to sounds of up to 2,000 hertz. The findings were surprising. Until now, scientists didn't know that mosquitoes could hear such high sounds. In addition, researchers had previously thought that female A. aegypti mosquitoes were deaf. A. aegypti mosquitoes spread diseases such as yellow fever and dengue fever. The scientists hope that by interfering with the mosquitoes acoustic courtship process, they’ll find better ways to control mosquito populations in places where these diseases occur. One way to do this would be to trick the females into mating with sterile male mosquitoes, those that can’t produce offspring. This might work because once an A. aegypti female mated with a sterile male, she wouldn’t mate with anyone else. Females tend to shun, or ignore, other males after mating. Cator and her colleagues note in the study that other disease-carrying insects have been controlled by the release of sterile males. At least A. aegypti females would be serenaded in the process.

Mosquito duets
Mosquito duets








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™