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Silk’s superpowers
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Fishy Cleaners
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The (kids') eyes have it
Internet Generation
Meet your mysterious relative
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Supergoo to the rescue
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Hitting the redo button on evolution
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The man who rocked biology to its core
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E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
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Arctic Algae Show Climate Change
Digging into a Tsunami Disaster
Easy Ways to Conserve Water
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Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
An Ocean View's Downside
A Vulture's Hidden Enemy
Finding the Past
Of Lice and Old Clothes
An Ancient Childhood
Stonehenge Settlement
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Sting Ray
Piranha
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Eat Out, Eat Smart
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
Strong Bones for Life
GSAT English Rules
Pronouns
Problems with Prepositions
Whoever vs. Whomever
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Exam Preparation
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Losing with Heads or Tails
A Sweet Advance in Candy Packing
Human Body
A Sour Taste in Your Mouth
Remembering Facts and Feelings
Workouts: Does Stretching Help?
Invertebrates
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Jaguars
Lhasa Apsos
Poodles
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Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
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Electric Backpack
One ring around them all
Dreams of Floating in Space
Plants
Getting the dirt on carbon
Surprise Visitor
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Asp
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Anacondas
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Pluto, plutoid: What's in a name?
Planets on the Edge
A Galaxy Far, Far, Far Away
Technology and Engineering
Squeezing Oil from Old Wells
Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go
Toy Challenge
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
What is a Preposition?
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
How to Fly Like a Bat
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Weather
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Earth's Poles in Peril
Where rivers run uphill
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Memory by Hypnosis

Hypnosis can seem like magic. When in this dreamlike state, people are easily convinced to do things they wouldn't normally do. Now, scientists have used hypnosis to study the mind's amazing and mysterious ability to focus on certain memories (such as the answer to a test question) while suppressing others (like what you did during vacation 3 years ago). The study may help explain how memory works and why it sometimes fails. To peer into how the brain digs up memories, researchers from the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel, showed people a documentary film. A week later, the scientists attempted to hypnotize the viewers. Some of the study participants were easily hypnotized. Others were not. While under hypnosis, participants were told to forget the movie. They were then brought out of the hypnotic state and asked to respond to a set of yes-or-no questions about the movie. While they answered the questions, scanners monitored activity in their brains. Participants then went through the process a second time. But this time, they were told to remember the movie. Brain scans showed clear differences between people who succumbed to hypnosis and those who didn't. In general, those who weren't hypnotized showed more activity in more parts of their brains than those who were. But the people who entered the trancelike state showed extra activity in a part of the brain called the prefrontal cortex. The researchers think that this area of the brain may be responsible for preventing a person from recalling certain memories. So, the prefrontal cortex might be the executive decision maker on whether you remember something or not.—Emily Sohn

Memory by Hypnosis
Memory by Hypnosis








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