Agriculture
Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Got Milk? How?
Middle school science adventures
Amphibians
Bullfrogs
Tree Frogs
Poison Dart Frogs
Animals
Spotting the World's Leggiest Animal
Stunts for High-Diving Ants
Big Squid
Behavior
Flower family knows its roots
Eating Troubles
Ear pain, weight gain
Birds
Vultures
Hummingbirds
Ospreys
Chemistry and Materials
Revving Up Green Machines
Earth from the inside out
The solar system's biggest junkyard
Computers
Small but WISE
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Getting in Touch with Touch
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dinosaur Dig
Fingerprinting Fossils
Dino Flesh from Fossil Bone
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Snowflakes and Avalanches
Detecting an Eerie Sea Glow
Drilling Deep for Fuel
Environment
Will Climate Change Depose Monarchs?
A Vulture's Hidden Enemy
Easy Ways to Conserve Water
Finding the Past
Big Woman of the Distant Past
Traces of Ancient Campfires
Ancient Cave Behavior
Fish
Angler Fish
Dogfish
Flashlight Fishes
Food and Nutrition
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
Sponges' secret weapon
Chocolate Rules
GSAT English Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
Problems with Prepositions
Who vs. Whom
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics
Math is a real brain bender
Math of the World
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Human Body
Cell Phone Tattlers
Gut Microbes and Weight
Speedy Gene Gives Runners a Boost
Invertebrates
Sea Urchin
Mollusks
Dragonflies
Mammals
Glider
Shih Tzus
Wolverines
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Children and Media
Physics
Spin, Splat, and Scramble
Speedy stars
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
Plants
Farms sprout in cities
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Sweet, Sticky Science
Reptiles
Copperhead Snakes
Alligators
Reptiles
Space and Astronomy
Icy Red Planet
Planet Hunters Nab Three More
Black Holes That Burp
Technology and Engineering
Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go
A Light Delay
A Satellite of Your Own
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Verb?
What is a Noun
Transportation
How to Fly Like a Bat
Robots on a Rocky Road
Middle school science adventures
Weather
A Change in Climate
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Science loses out when ice caps melt
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Memory by Hypnosis

Hypnosis can seem like magic. When in this dreamlike state, people are easily convinced to do things they wouldn't normally do. Now, scientists have used hypnosis to study the mind's amazing and mysterious ability to focus on certain memories (such as the answer to a test question) while suppressing others (like what you did during vacation 3 years ago). The study may help explain how memory works and why it sometimes fails. To peer into how the brain digs up memories, researchers from the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel, showed people a documentary film. A week later, the scientists attempted to hypnotize the viewers. Some of the study participants were easily hypnotized. Others were not. While under hypnosis, participants were told to forget the movie. They were then brought out of the hypnotic state and asked to respond to a set of yes-or-no questions about the movie. While they answered the questions, scanners monitored activity in their brains. Participants then went through the process a second time. But this time, they were told to remember the movie. Brain scans showed clear differences between people who succumbed to hypnosis and those who didn't. In general, those who weren't hypnotized showed more activity in more parts of their brains than those who were. But the people who entered the trancelike state showed extra activity in a part of the brain called the prefrontal cortex. The researchers think that this area of the brain may be responsible for preventing a person from recalling certain memories. So, the prefrontal cortex might be the executive decision maker on whether you remember something or not.—Emily Sohn

Memory by Hypnosis
Memory by Hypnosis








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