Agriculture
Growing Healthier Tomato Plants
Getting the dirt on carbon
Fast-flying fungal spores
Amphibians
Toads
Bullfrogs
Salamanders
Animals
Walktopus
Lucky Survival for Black Cats
Helping the Cause of Macaws
Behavior
When Darwin got sick of feathers
The case of the headless ant
From dipping to fishing
Birds
Swifts
Eagles
Parakeets
Chemistry and Materials
Butterfly Wings and Waterproof Coats
Music of the Future
Bandages that could bite back
Computers
Two monkeys see a more colorful world
Lighting goes digital
New eyes to scan the skies
Dinosaurs and Fossils
The Paleontologist and the Three Dinosaurs
Tiny Pterodactyl
Fossil Forests
E Learning Jamaica
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Earth's Lowly Rumble
Flower family knows its roots
Life under Ice
Environment
Where rivers run uphill
Sea Otters, Kelp, and Killer Whales
Ready, unplug, drive
Finding the Past
Little People Cause Big Surprise
Preserving Ancient Warrior Paint
Sahara Cemetery
Fish
Parrotfish
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Great White Shark
Food and Nutrition
Symbols from the Stone Age
Chew for Health
The Color of Health
GSAT English Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
Who vs. That vs. Which
Order of Adjectives
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Losing with Heads or Tails
Math is a real brain bender
Human Body
Surviving Olympic Heat
Sun Screen
Gut Germs to the Rescue
Invertebrates
Bedbugs
Dragonflies
Black Widow spiders
Mammals
Pitbulls
Kodiak Bear
Dingoes
Parents
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
Invisibility Ring
Extra Strings for New Sounds
One ring around them all
Plants
Bright Blooms That Glow
Underwater Jungles
Fungus Hunt
Reptiles
Garter Snakes
Copperhead Snakes
Crocodilians
Space and Astronomy
A Great Ball of Fire
A Smashing Display
Melting Snow on Mars
Technology and Engineering
Slip Sliming Away
Smart Windows
Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
Problems with Prepositions
What is a Noun
Transportation
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Where rivers run uphill
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Weather
A Change in Climate
The solar system's biggest junkyard
In Antarctica watch the heat (and your step)
Add your Article

Meet the new dinos

The last dinosaurs died about 65 million years ago, long before humans started walking around. Scientists can still learn new things about these ancient animals though, thanks to the fossils they left behind. Paleontologists are scientists who study dinosaurs, and recently these researchers have made some surprising discoveries. Canadian scientists announced they had identified the smallest meat-eating dinosaur in North America. The fossilized remains of the tiny dino had been found originally in 1982 but were recently rediscovered in a museum drawer. The remains were unearthed near Dinosaur Provincial Park, a protected area in the Canadian province of Alberta. The park is a popular place for dinosaur fans and researchers alike — more than 30 dinosaur species have been identified there. Weighing about 4.2 pounds, the diminutive dino, whose scientific name is Hesperonychus elizabethae, was the size of a chicken. The previous record holder for smallest meat-eating dinosaur in North America weighed more than 20 pounds, or more than five of the newly identified dino. About 75 million years ago, this newest tiny dino roamed the southern part of Alberta, just north of Montana. The scientists say the dinosaur had sickle-shaped claws, and its diet probably included insects, lizards and birds. The fossils suggest that the dinosaur is related to other small raptors (another kind of dinosaur) found in China. About the same time the Canadian paleontologists announced the chicken-sized dinosaur news, a Chinese paleontologist announced a surprising discovery about dinosaur feathers. Feathers cover all modern-day birds, and in previous studies paleontologists have identified a featherlike structure called “dinofuzz” on some dinosaur remains. Until now, however, dino feathers had been found only in theropods and their relatives, the saurichian dinosaurs. Theropods were carnivorous dinos that walked on two legs; saurichians are also known as “lizard-hipped” dinosaurs. Hai-Lu You, a paleontologist at the Chinese Academy of Geological Sciences in Beijing, recently described featherlike structures on a new kind of dinosaur. The species, Tianyulong confuciusi, lived between 120 and 130 million years ago. Unlike other feathered dinosaurs, however, this species was not a theropod. It was an ornithischian, or bird-hipped, dinosaur. The fact that You found featherlike fossils on a bird-hipped dinosaur was a big deal. It means that feathers may have evolved, or developed over a long period of time, from structures on an ancestor of both saurichian and ornithischian dinosaurs. This ancestral creature would have lived about 220 million years ago. “This is a surprise,” says Lawrence Witmer, a paleontologist at Ohio University in Athens. “Finding a Chinese dinosaur with feathers is not remarkable, but finding one on the wrong side of the dinosaur family tree is.” On the other hand, the fossil remains may show that many different species of dinosaurs developed feathers. It’s too early to tell. So far, only one fossil of the new species has been unearthed. As more remains come to light, they may show that the featherlike structures in the fossil are something other than feathers. Power words: (from Britannica online) fossil: a remnant or trace of an organism of a past geologic age, such as a skeleton or leaf imprint, embedded and preserved in Earth's crust ornithischian dinosaurs: One of the two major groups of dinosaurs, the other being the saurischians. Ornithischian hip bones were arranged like those of birds. Despite this similarity, ornithischians are not related to birds. saurichian dinosaurs: The other major group of dinosaurs; it includes all birds. These dinos have hip bones arranged like those of typical reptiles.

Meet the new dinos
Meet the new dinos








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™