Agriculture
Where Have All the Bees Gone?
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Growing Healthier Tomato Plants
Amphibians
Salamanders and Newts
Newts
Tree Frogs
Animals
A Spider's Taste for Blood
Color-Changing Bugs
Insects Take a Breather
Behavior
The Disappearing Newspaper
A Recipe for Happiness
Lost Sight, Found Sound
Birds
Albatrosses
Geese
Cranes
Chemistry and Materials
Music of the Future
Undercover Detectives
A New Basketball Gets Slick
Computers
Earth from the inside out
The science of disappearing
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Hunting by Sucking, Long Ago
An Ancient Spider's Web
Dino Takeout for Mammals
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
A Volcano Wakes Up
Shrinking Glaciers
Hot Summers, Wild Fires
Environment
Shrimpy Invaders
Groundwater and the Water Cycle
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Finding the Past
Ancient Cave Behavior
Digging Up Stone Age Art
Preserving Ancient Warrior Paint
Fish
Flashlight Fishes
Megamouth Sharks
White Tip Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Yummy bugs
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
Packing Fat
GSAT English Rules
Capitalization Rules
Problems with Prepositions
Order of Adjectives
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
Scotiabank Jamaica Foundation Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) Scholarships
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
Detecting True Art
Play for Science
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Human Body
Music in the Brain
Spit Power
The tell-tale bacteria
Invertebrates
Grasshoppers
Mollusks
Flatworms
Mammals
Wildcats
Beavers
Bulldogs
Parents
How children learn
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Physics
The Particle Zoo
Project Music
Black Hole Journey
Plants
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
Making the most of a meal
White fuzzy mold not as friendly as it looks
Reptiles
Turtles
Caimans
Boa Constrictors
Space and Astronomy
No Fat Stars
Tossing Out a Black Hole Life Preserver
Baby Star
Technology and Engineering
Dancing with Robots
Model Plane Flies the Atlantic
Riding Sunlight
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
What is a Verb?
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Troubles with Hubble
Where rivers run uphill
Weather
Watering the Air
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Catching Some Rays
Add your Article

Mako Sharks

Shortfin makos are renowned for their speed and their ability to leap out of the water. Mako sharks have the most perfect hydrodynamic shape of all sharks, and this, combined with the lamnidae's typical high aerobic muscle mass, reflects in the spectacular speed and agility of both the longfin and shortfin sharks. Weights and Measures: With a full-grown length of 9 - 13 ft (2.75 - 4 m), the shortfin mako has been reported to weigh up to 1,750 pounds (800 kg), and has a bluish back and white underside. Although the sexes grow at about the same rate, females are thought to have a longer life span, grow larger and weigh more than the males. Just the Facts: The longfin mako's full-grown length is over 4 metres, and it has a dark bluish back and white underside. The pectoral fins are about as long as the head or longer, relatively broad-tipped in young and adults. The snout is usually narrowly to bluntly pointed, usually not acute. The cusps of upper and lower anterior teeth are straight, with tips not reversed. The caudal fin is lunate, with a very long lower lobe. Where in the World? The shortfin mako is found in temperate and tropical seas worldwide. Some of the largest makos in the world can be found in New England waters. The closely related longfin mako shark, Isurus paucus, is found in the Gulf Stream or warmer offshore waters. Shark Olympians: The shortfin and longfin mako's speeds have been recorded at over 22 miles (35 kilometres) per hour. Shortfin makos can jump up to 20 feet in the air. Due to its speed and agility, this high leaping fish is sought as game worldwide. Birds and Bees: The shortfin mako shark is a yolk-sac ovoviviparous shark, meaning it gives birth to live young who feed from a sac full of yolk in the womb. The gestation period for a mako shark is 15 - 18 months. Shortfin mako embryos in the female's body actually consume each other to get nutrients. This is called intrauterine cannibalism. What's in a Name? The name "mako" comes from the Ma-ori language for blue lightning, reflecting its colour and speed.

Mako Sharks
Mako Sharks








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™