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The nerve of one animal
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Night of the living ants
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A Meal Plan for Birds
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Flytrap Machine
Heaviest named element is official
The metal detector in your mouth
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Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
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Polar Ice Feels the Heat
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Toxic Cleanups Get a Microbe Boost
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Stone Tablet May Solve Maya Mystery
A Long Haul
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42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
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Prime Time for Cicadas
Play for Science
How to Slice a Cake Fairly
Human Body
A New Touch
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What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
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The Particle Zoo
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When Fungi and Algae Marry
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A Moon's Icy Spray
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Pluto, plutoid: What's in a name?
Technology and Engineering
Searching for Alien Life
Shape Shifting
Spinach Power for Solar Cells
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
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Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Reach for the Sky
Where rivers run uphill
Robots on a Rocky Road
Weather
Watering the Air
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Earth's Poles in Peril
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Mahi-Mahi

The Mahi-mahi (Coryphaena hippurus), also known as dolphin, dolphin-fish, or dorado, are surface-dwelling ray-finned fish found in off-shoretropical and subtropical waters world-wide. They are one of only two members of the Coryphaenidae family, the other being the Pompano dolphinfish. The name "mahi-mahi" ("strong-strong" in Hawaiian), particularly on restaurant menus, has been adopted in recent years to avoid confusing these fish with dolphins, members of the porpoise family, which are mammals Mahi-mahi have a lifespan of no more than 3 to 4 years. Sport catches average 7 to 13 kg (15 to 25 pounds). Though they can grow to be up to 45 kg (90 pounds) any Mahi-mahi over 40 pounds is exceptional. Mahi-mahi have compressed bodies and long dorsal fins extending almost the entire length of their bodies. Their anal fins are sharply concave. They are distinguished by dazzling colors: golden on the sides, bright blues and greens on the sides and back. Mature males also have prominent foreheads protruding well above the body proper. When they are removed from the water, the fish often change between several colors, finally fading to a muted yellow-gray upon death. Mahi-mahi are carnivorous, feeding on flying fish, crabs, squid, mackerel, and other small fish. They have also been known to eat zooplankton, squid, and crustaceans. Mahi-mahi are highly sought game fish throughout their range because of their beauty and fighting ability. Their flesh has excellent flavor and firm texture flavor. Mahi-mahi have become popular restaurant fare in many areas, sometimes eaten as a substitute for swordfish because, having scales, they are considered kosher. One of the fastest-growing fish, thought to live no more than 5 years; swimming speed is estimated at 50 knots; spawns in warm ocean currents throughout much of the year; young found in sargassum weed; feeds on flying fish and squid.

Mahi-Mahi
Mahi-Mahi








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