Agriculture
Flush-Free Fertilizer
Watering the Air
Chicken Eggs as Drug Factories
Amphibians
Tree Frogs
Salamanders
Poison Dart Frogs
Animals
Moss Echoes of Hunting
Blotchy Face, Big-Time Wasp
Jay Watch
Behavior
Nice Chimps
Island of Hope
Internet Generation
Birds
Crows
Ducks
Mockingbirds
Chemistry and Materials
Flytrap Machine
A New Basketball Gets Slick
Fog Buster
Computers
Batteries built by Viruses
The Shape of the Internet
A New Look at Saturn's rings
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Fossil Forests
Fingerprinting Fossils
Early Birds Ready to Rumble
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Deep History
Greener Diet
Riding to Earth's Core
Environment
The Down Side of Keeping Clean
A Change in Leaf Color
Shrimpy Invaders
Finding the Past
An Ancient Childhood
Early Maya Writing
Sahara Cemetery
Fish
Cleaning Up Fish Farms
Sting Ray
Tiger Sharks
Food and Nutrition
Building a Food Pyramid
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
The mercury in that tuna
GSAT English Rules
Order of Adjectives
Who vs. That vs. Which
Who vs. Whom
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
10 Common Mistakes When Preparing for the GSAT Math Test
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
Math of the World
Human Body
Sun Screen
Foul Play?
Speedy Gene Gives Runners a Boost
Invertebrates
Mosquitos
Clams
Daddy Long Legs
Mammals
Basset Hounds
Cows
Siamese Cats
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
How children learn
Physics
Road Bumps
One ring around them all
Gaining a Swift Lift
Plants
Fastest Plant on Earth
Surprise Visitor
White fuzzy mold not as friendly as it looks
Reptiles
Komodo Dragons
Alligators
Crocodilians
Space and Astronomy
Evidence of a Wet Mars
Sun Flips Out to Flip-Flop
Planning for Mars
Technology and Engineering
Supersuits for Superheroes
A Micro-Dose of Your Own Medicine
Smart Windows
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
Problems with Prepositions
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
Transportation
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Robots on the Road, Again
Ready, unplug, drive
Weather
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
A Change in Climate
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Add your Article

Mahi-Mahi

The Mahi-mahi (Coryphaena hippurus), also known as dolphin, dolphin-fish, or dorado, are surface-dwelling ray-finned fish found in off-shoretropical and subtropical waters world-wide. They are one of only two members of the Coryphaenidae family, the other being the Pompano dolphinfish. The name "mahi-mahi" ("strong-strong" in Hawaiian), particularly on restaurant menus, has been adopted in recent years to avoid confusing these fish with dolphins, members of the porpoise family, which are mammals Mahi-mahi have a lifespan of no more than 3 to 4 years. Sport catches average 7 to 13 kg (15 to 25 pounds). Though they can grow to be up to 45 kg (90 pounds) any Mahi-mahi over 40 pounds is exceptional. Mahi-mahi have compressed bodies and long dorsal fins extending almost the entire length of their bodies. Their anal fins are sharply concave. They are distinguished by dazzling colors: golden on the sides, bright blues and greens on the sides and back. Mature males also have prominent foreheads protruding well above the body proper. When they are removed from the water, the fish often change between several colors, finally fading to a muted yellow-gray upon death. Mahi-mahi are carnivorous, feeding on flying fish, crabs, squid, mackerel, and other small fish. They have also been known to eat zooplankton, squid, and crustaceans. Mahi-mahi are highly sought game fish throughout their range because of their beauty and fighting ability. Their flesh has excellent flavor and firm texture flavor. Mahi-mahi have become popular restaurant fare in many areas, sometimes eaten as a substitute for swordfish because, having scales, they are considered kosher. One of the fastest-growing fish, thought to live no more than 5 years; swimming speed is estimated at 50 knots; spawns in warm ocean currents throughout much of the year; young found in sargassum weed; feeds on flying fish and squid.

Mahi-Mahi
Mahi-Mahi








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™