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E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
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Results of GSAT are in schools this week
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Warmest Year on Record
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2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
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A Long Haul
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What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
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The Pressure of Scuba Diving
Einstein's Skateboard
Gaining a Swift Lift
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Sweet, Sticky Science
The algae invasion
Tracking the Sun Improves Plant Pollen
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Space and Astronomy
A Planet's Slim-Fast Plan
The two faces of Mars
Catching a Comet's Tail
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Drawing Energy out of Wastewater
A Clean Getaway
Machine Copy
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
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What is a Noun
Transportation
Ready, unplug, drive
Revving Up Green Machines
How to Fly Like a Bat
Weather
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
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Lucky Survival for Black Cats

Black cats bring bad luck, according to superstition. But the same quirks of biology that make some cats black might also have protected the dark-haired felines from diseases a long time ago. In a range of animals, from mice to sheep, scientists have already identified two genes that play a role in coat color. Depending on how they work together, the two genes make an animal's fur look a range of colors, from reddish-yellow to blackish-brown. Now, a new study shows that solid-black house cats have a certain mutation in one of those genes. Black jaguars have a distinctive mutation in the other gene, and this defect is missing in jaguars that are more typically yellowish-brown in color. Meanwhile, dark-brown jaguarundis—felines native to South and Central America—have their own particular mutation in the second gene. The new findings made the researchers wonder why some cats are black in the first place. Camouflage at night is one explanation. Other research on coat-color genes suggests that the same mutation that makes some cats black might also have helped them resist a deadly infection thousands of years ago. So black cats may actually be the lucky ones after all.—E. Sohn

Lucky Survival for Black Cats
Lucky Survival for Black Cats








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