Agriculture
Flush-Free Fertilizer
Getting the dirt on carbon
Making the most of a meal
Amphibians
Newts
Salamanders
Poison Dart Frogs
Animals
Life on the Down Low
Little Bee Brains That Could
A Tongue and a Half
Behavior
Between a rock and a wet place
Wired for Math
Mice sense each other's fear
Birds
Cranes
Crows
Rheas
Chemistry and Materials
Makeup Science
Screaming for Ice Cream
Scientist Profile: Wally Gilbert
Computers
Hitting the redo button on evolution
Look into My Eyes
Small but WISE
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Dino Flesh from Fossil Bone
Early Birds Ready to Rumble
Feathered Fossils
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Less Mixing Can Affect Lake's Ecosystem
Rodent Rubbish as an Ice-Age Thermometer
What is groundwater
Environment
Groundwater and the Water Cycle
Swimming with Sharks and Stingrays
The Oily Gulf
Finding the Past
Stone Age Sole Survivors
If Only Bones Could Speak
Prehistoric Trips to the Dentist
Fish
Puffer Fish
Whale Sharks
Bass
Food and Nutrition
Making good, brown fat
Chocolate Rules
Eat Out, Eat Smart
GSAT English Rules
Whoever vs. Whomever
Subject and Verb Agreement
Adjectives and Adverbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Exam Preparation
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Scholarship
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Mathematics
Losing with Heads or Tails
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Human Body
From Stem Cell to Any Cell
Spitting Up Blobs to Get Around
Taste Messenger
Invertebrates
Flies
Spiders
Dragonflies
Mammals
Deers
Cougars
African Hippopotamus
Parents
How children learn
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
Black Hole Journey
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Gaining a Swift Lift
Plants
Fastest Plant on Earth
Assembling the Tree of Life
Sweet, Sticky Science
Reptiles
Iguanas
Rattlesnakes
Gila Monsters
Space and Astronomy
Solving a Sedna Mystery
Pluto, plutoid: What's in a name?
A Dusty Birthplace
Technology and Engineering
Roll-Up Computer Monitors to Go
Sugar Power for Cell Phones
Shape Shifting
The Parts of Speech
Pronouns
What is a Preposition?
Adjectives and Adverbs
Transportation
Revving Up Green Machines
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Reach for the Sky
Weather
Earth's Poles in Peril
Warmest Year on Record
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
Add your Article

Leeches

Leeches are annelids comprising the subclass Hirudinea. There are freshwater, terrestrial and marine leeches. Like earthworms, leeches are hermaphrodites. The medicinal leech, Hirudo medicinalis, which is native to Europe, and its congeners have been used for clinical bloodletting for thousands of years. All leech species are carnivorous and have evolved from detritus-eating earthworms/oligochaete ancestors. Some are predatory, feeding on a variety of invertebrates such as worms, snails, insect larvae, crustaceans, while a very few are blood-sucking leeches, feeding on the blood of vertebrates such as amphibians, reptiles, waterfowl, fish, and mammals. Given the opportunity, they will also feed on human blood. The most important predators on leeches are fish, aquatic insects, crayfish and other leeches. Haemophagic leeches attach to their hosts and remain there until they become full, at which point they fall off to digest. Leeches' bodies are composed of 34 segments. They all have a anterior (oral) sucker formed from the last six segments of their body, which is used to connect to a host for feeding, and are known to release an anaesthetic to remain unnoticed by the host. They use a combination of mucus and suction (caused by concentric muscles in those six segments) to stay attached and secrete an anti-clotting enzyme into the host's blood stream. Some species of leech will nurture their young, providing food, transport, and protection, which is unusual behavior in an invertebrate. The anatomy of medicinal leeches may look simple, but more details are found beyond the macro level. Externally, medicinal leeches tend to have a brown and red striped design on an olive colored background. These organisms have two suckers, one at each end, called the anterior and posterior sucker. The posterior is mainly used for leverage while the anterior sucker, consisting of the jaw and teeth, is where the feeding takes place. Medicinal leeches have three jaws that look like little saws, and on them are about 100 sharp teeth used to incise the host.

Leeches
Leeches








Designed and Powered by HBJamaica.com™