Agriculture
Protecting Cows—and People—from a Deadly Disease
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Making the most of a meal
Amphibians
Bullfrogs
Salamanders and Newts
Poison Dart Frogs
Animals
A Sense of Danger
Walks on the Wild Side
Moss Echoes of Hunting
Behavior
From dipping to fishing
Mind-reading Machine
The nerve of one animal
Birds
Macaws
Tropical Birds
Parrots
Chemistry and Materials
The Taste of Bubbles
Graphene's superstrength
Smelly Traps for Lampreys
Computers
A New Look at Saturn's rings
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
The Book of Life
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Fossil Fly from Antarctica
Dinosaurs Grow Up
Fingerprinting Fossils
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Earth
Island of Hope
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Flower family knows its roots
Environment
Power of the Wind
Catching Some Rays
Seabirds Deliver Arctic Pollutants
Finding the Past
Stone Tablet May Solve Maya Mystery
Unearthing Ancient Astronomy
Sahara Cemetery
Fish
Halibut
Megamouth Sharks
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Food and Nutrition
Healing Honey
The Color of Health
Eat Out, Eat Smart
GSAT English Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
Adjectives and Adverbs
Problems with Prepositions
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Scholarship
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Scholarship
GSAT Mathematics
It's a Math World for Animals
Math Naturals
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
Human Body
Attacking Asthma
Cell Phones and Possible Health Hazards
Sleeping Soundly for a Longer Life
Invertebrates
Leeches
Oysters
Horseshoe Crabs
Mammals
Lynxes
Seal
Canines
Parents
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Children and Media
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Extra Strings for New Sounds
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
Plants
A Change in Leaf Color
Fungus Hunt
The algae invasion
Reptiles
Reptiles
Cobras
Anacondas
Space and Astronomy
Supernovas Shed Light on Dark Energy
Killers from Outer Space
Pluto's New Moons
Technology and Engineering
Slip Sliming Away
Spinach Power for Solar Cells
Switchable Lenses Improve Vision
The Parts of Speech
Problems with Prepositions
Pronouns
What is a Noun
Transportation
Middle school science adventures
Reach for the Sky
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Weather
Arctic Melt
Where rivers run uphill
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
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Krill

Krill are small, shrimp-like ocean crustaceans. These pink, translucent animals congregate in large, dense masses called "swarms" or "clouds," that turn areas of the ocean's surface pink. Krill are very important in the food web since many animals eat them. Krill have a hard exoskeleton, many legs (used for swimming and gathering food), and a segmented body. Females produce almost 1,000 eggs each summer; the eggs are laid at the surface, but fall to great depths. The hatchlings swim back to the surface to feed. Like all crustaceans, krill molt their exoskeleton as they grow. Species: There are about 85 species of krill, ranging in size from less than 0.5 inch (1 cm) up to 5.5 inches (14 cm) long. The dominant krill in the southern polar oceans is the Antarctic krill, which is up to 2.3 inches (6 cm) long and weighs about 0.035 ounces (1 g). Antarctic krill have a life span of about 5 to 10 years. Antarctic Krill is considered to be a keystone species, an organism upon which very many Antarctic predators depend. Krill eat phytoplankton, single-celled plants that float in the seas near the surface. Krill spend their days in the dark depths of the ocean (about 320 feet = 100 m deep), safe from their major predators (like whales and sea birds). They swim to the surface each night to eat, but can fast for up to 200 days, shrinking in size during that time.

Krill
Krill








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