Agriculture
Middle school science adventures
Springing forward
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Amphibians
Salamanders
Poison Dart Frogs
Tree Frogs
Animals
Polly Shouldn't Get a Cracker
G-Tunes with a Message
A Fallout Feast for Crabs
Behavior
Reading Body Language
Dino-bite!
A Recipe for Happiness
Birds
Crows
Kiwis
Kingfishers
Chemistry and Materials
Gooey Secrets of Mussel Power
Boosting Fuel Cells
The chemistry of sleeplessness
Computers
A Light Delay
Nonstop Robot
The Book of Life
Dinosaurs and Fossils
The Paleontologist and the Three Dinosaurs
Dino Flesh from Fossil Bone
The bug that may have killed a dinosaur
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2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Easy Ways to Conserve Water
On the Trail of America's Next Top Scientists
Farms sprout in cities
Environment
Cactus Goo for Clean Water
A Newspaper's Hidden Cost
Missing Tigers in India
Finding the Past
A Plankhouse Past
A Volcano's Deadly Ash
Childhood's Long History
Fish
Goldfish
Nurse Sharks
Lungfish
Food and Nutrition
Chew for Health
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
Yummy bugs
GSAT English Rules
Order of Adjectives
Who vs. That vs. Which
Finding Subjects and Verbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Mathematics
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Math Naturals
Human Body
Attacking Asthma
Kids now getting 'adult' disease
Don't Eat That Sandwich!
Invertebrates
Praying Mantis
Sponges
Fleas
Mammals
Great Danes
Little Brown Bats
Felines
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
How children learn
Physics
Strange Universe: The Stuff of Darkness
Black Hole Journey
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Plants
Fast-flying fungal spores
Making the most of a meal
Sweet, Sticky Science
Reptiles
Reptiles
Crocodiles
Turtles
Space and Astronomy
Return to Space
Baby Star
A Dusty Birthplace
Technology and Engineering
A Light Delay
Bionic Bacteria
Space Umbrellas to Shield Earth
The Parts of Speech
What is a Noun
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Robots on a Rocky Road
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Weather
Either Martians or Mars has gas
The solar system's biggest junkyard
The Best Defense Is a Good Snow Fence
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Jay Watch

When some birds store food for future meals, they pay close attention to who might be watching when they hide the food. In the presence of thieves, the birds go to extra trouble to save their hoards. Among western scrub jays, certain birds are ranked higher than others. High-ranked birds often steal food from birds of lower rank. Low-ranked birds never steal from their superiors, but they sometimes steal from others of the same rank. In a generous spirit, jays allow their mates to raid each other's hoards. In a recent set of tests, scientists gave some yummy waxworms to individual jays. They also provided two ice cube trays, filled with pellets, as hiding places. When a jay other than its mate was watching, a bird would hide more waxworms in the tray that was farther away from the watcher. Later, when revisiting the trays in private, any hider who'd been watched by a superior during the first episode shifted more treats to other hiding places than did a bird watched by a subordinate, a mate, or no other jay. Next, the researchers let a jay hide waxworms in a single tray while a jay of similar rank watched. In the second round, there was a different observer and a different tray for hiding food. When the hider came back to the scene and found one of the original observers watching, it remembered which tray it had used while that observer was watching. Then, it went about moving worms away from that tray to the other one. And the jay would be very sneaky while doing it. Keeping the food hidden in its beak, it would poke its beak into several possible hiding places. A spy couldn't easily tell into which spot the food was actually placed. Scientists were surprised to find evidence that birds could tell the difference between individuals and could remember what those individuals knew. The new findings are "just the last step in a long series of experiments showing that birds do all kinds of things," says Tom Smulders of the University of Newcastle in England. The term "birdbrain" may be a compliment after all!E. Sohn

Jay Watch
Jay Watch








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