Agriculture
Hungry bug seeks hot meal
Treating peanut allergy bit by bit
Middle school science adventures
Amphibians
Bullfrogs
Frogs and Toads
Tree Frogs
Animals
A Whale's Amazing Tooth
Feeding School for Meerkats
Cacophony Acoustics
Behavior
GSAT Mathematics Quiz, Teaching Math, teaching anxiety
Night of the living ants
Calculating crime
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Nightingales
Ospreys
Pelicans
Chemistry and Materials
Lighting goes digital
Getting the dirt on carbon
Cooking Up Superhard Diamonds
Computers
Small but WISE
Play for Science
Supersonic Splash
Dinosaurs and Fossils
A Living Fossil
Fossil Fly from Antarctica
Big Fish in Ancient Waters
E Learning Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Unnatural Disasters
The Rise of Yellowstone
Recipe for a Hurricane
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Power of the Wind
Where rivers run uphill
Seabirds Deliver Arctic Pollutants
Finding the Past
Sahara Cemetery
Traces of Ancient Campfires
Untangling Human Origins
Fish
Skates
Skates and Rays
A Grim Future for Some Killer Whales
Food and Nutrition
Strong Bones for Life
Recipe for Health
The Color of Health
GSAT English Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
Who vs. That vs. Which
Finding Subjects and Verbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
Preparing for the GSAT Exam
Ministry of Education Announces 82 GSAT Scholarships for 2010
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Practice Papers | GSAT Mathematics | Maths
GSAT Mathematics
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Human Body
Cell Phone Tattlers
Electricity's Spark of Life
Music in the Brain
Invertebrates
Invertebrates
Millipedes
Spiders
Mammals
Wombats
Sheep
African Wild Dog
Parents
Children and Media
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
Expert report highlights the importance to parents of reading to children!
Physics
Project Music
Gaining a Swift Lift
Hold on to your stars, ladies and gentlemen
Plants
Plants Travel Wind Highways
Sweet, Sticky Science
A Change in Leaf Color
Reptiles
Lizards
Tortoises
Cobras
Space and Astronomy
Pluto, plutoid: What's in a name?
Roving the Red Planet
A Family in Space
Technology and Engineering
Beyond Bar Codes
Algae Motors
Riding Sunlight
The Parts of Speech
Adjectives and Adverbs
Countable and Uncountable Nouns
What is a Noun
Transportation
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Tinkering With the Basic Bike
Charged cars that would charge
Weather
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
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It's a Small E-mail World After All

We're all connected. You can send an e-mail message to a friend, and your friend can pass it on to one of his or her friends, and that friend can do the same, continuing the chain. Eventually, your message could reach just about anyone in the world, and it might take only five to seven e-mails for the message to get there. Scientists recently tested that idea in a study involving 24,000 people. Participants had to try to get a message forwarded to one of 18 randomly chosen people. Each participant started by sending one e-mail to someone they knew. Recipients could then forward the e-mail once to someone they knew, and so on. Targets, who were randomly assigned by researchers from Columbia University in New York, lived in 13 countries. They included an Australian police officer, a Norwegian veterinarian, and a college professor. Out of 24,000 chains, only 384 reached their goal. The rest petered out, usually because one of the recipients was either too busy to forward the message or thought it was junk mail. The links that reached their goal made it in an average of 4.05 e-mails. Based on the lengths of the failed chains, the researchers estimated that two strangers could generally make contact in five to seven e-mails. The most successful chains relied on casual acquaintances rather than close friends. That's because your close friends know each other whereas your acquaintances tend to know people you don't know. The phenomenon, known as the strength of weak ties, explains why people tend to get jobs through people they know casually but aren't that close to. So, start networking and instant messaging now. As they say in show business: It's all about who you know.E. Sohn

It's a Small E-mail World After All
It's a Small E-mail World After All








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