Agriculture
Fast-flying fungal spores
Flush-Free Fertilizer
New Gene Fights Potato Blight
Amphibians
Toads
Bullfrogs
Tree Frogs
Animals
Killer Flatworms Hunt with Poison
Living in the Desert
A Spider's Taste for Blood
Behavior
Seeing red means danger ahead
Newly named fish crawls and hops
Mice sense each other's fear
Birds
Albatrosses
Hummingbirds
Storks
Chemistry and Materials
Atomic Drive
Spinning Clay into Cotton
Popping to Perfection
Computers
Seen on the Science Fair Scene
Earth from the inside out
Getting in Touch with Touch
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Fossil Fly from Antarctica
Dino Takeout for Mammals
Dino Flesh from Fossil Bone
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2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Plastic-munching microbes
Flower family knows its roots
Killer Space Rock Snuffed Out Ancient Life
Environment
Groundwater and the Water Cycle
Fishing for Fun Takes Toll
Toxic Cleanups Get a Microbe Boost
Finding the Past
Little People Cause Big Surprise
Your inner Neandertal
A Volcano's Deadly Ash
Fish
Perches
Marlin
Skates and Rays
Food and Nutrition
Chew for Health
Chocolate Rules
Building a Food Pyramid
GSAT English Rules
Problems with Prepositions
Finding Subjects and Verbs
Who vs. Whom
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
GSAT Scholarship
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2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
GSAT Exam Preparation
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Mathematics
How a Venus Flytrap Snaps Shut
Math Naturals
Math and our number sense: PassGSAT.com
Human Body
Walking to Exercise the Brain
Sleeping Soundly for a Longer Life
Surviving Olympic Heat
Invertebrates
Lice
Dragonflies
Worms
Mammals
African Ostrich
Raccoons
Asiatic Bears
Parents
What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Children and Media
Physics
Thinner Air, Less Splatter
Electric Backpack
The Particle Zoo
Plants
When Fungi and Algae Marry
Getting the dirt on carbon
Fastest Plant on Earth
Reptiles
Rattlesnakes
Pythons
Cobras
Space and Astronomy
A Dusty Birthplace
The two faces of Mars
Asteroid Lost and Found
Technology and Engineering
Searching for Alien Life
Slip Sliming Away
Sugar Power for Cell Phones
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
Adjectives and Adverbs
What is a Noun
Transportation
Charged cars that would charge
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Morphing a Wing to Save Fuel
Weather
A Dire Shortage of Water
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Watering the Air
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It's a Small E-mail World After All

We're all connected. You can send an e-mail message to a friend, and your friend can pass it on to one of his or her friends, and that friend can do the same, continuing the chain. Eventually, your message could reach just about anyone in the world, and it might take only five to seven e-mails for the message to get there. Scientists recently tested that idea in a study involving 24,000 people. Participants had to try to get a message forwarded to one of 18 randomly chosen people. Each participant started by sending one e-mail to someone they knew. Recipients could then forward the e-mail once to someone they knew, and so on. Targets, who were randomly assigned by researchers from Columbia University in New York, lived in 13 countries. They included an Australian police officer, a Norwegian veterinarian, and a college professor. Out of 24,000 chains, only 384 reached their goal. The rest petered out, usually because one of the recipients was either too busy to forward the message or thought it was junk mail. The links that reached their goal made it in an average of 4.05 e-mails. Based on the lengths of the failed chains, the researchers estimated that two strangers could generally make contact in five to seven e-mails. The most successful chains relied on casual acquaintances rather than close friends. That's because your close friends know each other whereas your acquaintances tend to know people you don't know. The phenomenon, known as the strength of weak ties, explains why people tend to get jobs through people they know casually but aren't that close to. So, start networking and instant messaging now. As they say in show business: It's all about who you know.E. Sohn

It's a Small E-mail World After All
It's a Small E-mail World After All








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