Agriculture
Growing Healthier Tomato Plants
Watering the Air
Springing forward
Amphibians
Toads
Newts
Tree Frogs
Animals
Armadillo
Glimpses of a Legendary Woodpecker
A Tongue and a Half
Behavior
Body clocks
Math Naturals
A Light Delay
Birds
Tropical Birds
Owls
Storks
Chemistry and Materials
Watching out for vultures
Flytrap Machine
The memory of a material
Computers
Music of the Future
A New Look at Saturn's rings
New twists for phantom limbs
Dinosaurs and Fossils
Did Dinosaurs Do Handstands?
Digging for Ancient DNA
Ancient Critter Caught Shedding Its Skin
E Learning Jamaica
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Earth
Science loses out when ice caps melt
Shrinking Glaciers
Riding to Earth's Core
Environment
Where rivers run uphill
To Catch a Dragonfly
Food Web Woes
Finding the Past
Digging Up Stone Age Art
Sahara Cemetery
Fakes in the museum
Fish
Marlin
Electric Eel
Mahi-Mahi
Food and Nutrition
Yummy bugs
Eat Out, Eat Smart
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
GSAT English Rules
Who vs. That vs. Which
Whoever vs. Whomever
Adjectives and Adverbs
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
GSAT stars reap scholarship glory
March 21-22, 2013: Over 43,000 students will take the GSAT Exam
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Exam Preparation
GSAT Mathematics
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
A Sweet Advance in Candy Packing
Play for Science
Human Body
Music in the Brain
Cell Phone Tattlers
Don't Eat That Sandwich!
Invertebrates
Jellyfish
Krill
Shrimps
Mammals
Grizzly Bear
Woolly Mammoths
Quokkas
Parents
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
Raise a Lifelong Reader by Reading Aloud
The Surprising Meaning and Benefits of Nursery Rhymes
Physics
Echoes of a Stretched Egg
Speedy stars
The Mirror Universe of Antimatter
Plants
City Trees Beat Country Trees
Fungus Hunt
Assembling the Tree of Life
Reptiles
Iguanas
Black Mamba
Pythons
Space and Astronomy
A Very Distant Planet Says "Cheese"
Older Stars, New Age for the Universe
Return to Space
Technology and Engineering
A Clean Getaway
Machine Copy
Dancing with Robots
The Parts of Speech
Problems with Prepositions
What is a Preposition?
What is a Verb?
Transportation
Reach for the Sky
Ready, unplug, drive
Robots on a Rocky Road
Weather
Antarctica warms, which threatens penguins
Where rivers run uphill
Warmest Year on Record
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Invisibility Ring

Scientists can't yet make an invisibility cloak like the one that Harry Potter uses. But, for the first time, they've constructed a simple cloaking device that makes itself and something placed inside it invisible to microwaves. When a person "sees" an object, his or her eye senses many different waves of visible light as they bounce off the object. The eye and brain then work together to organize these sensations and reconstruct the object's original shape. So, to make an object invisible, scientists have to keep waves from bouncing off it. And they have to make sure the object casts no shadow. Otherwise, the absence of reflected light on one side would give the object away. Invisibility isn't possible yet with waves of light that the human eye can see. But it is now possible with microwaves. Like visible light, microwaves are a form of radiant energy. They are part of the electromagnetic spectrum, which also includes radio waves, infrared light, ultraviolet rays, X rays, and gamma rays. The wavelengths of microwaves are shorter than those of radio waves but longer than those of visible light. The scientists' new "invisibility device" is the size of a drink coaster and shaped like a ring. The ring is made of a special material with unusual abilities. When microwaves strike the ring, very few bounce off it. Instead, they pass through the ring, which bends the waves all the way around until they reach the opposite side. The waves then return to their original paths. To a detector set up to receive microwaves on the other side of the ring, it looks as if the waves never changed their paths—as if there were no object in the way! So, the ring is effectively invisible. When the researchers put a small copper loop inside the ring, it, too, is nearly invisible. However, the cloaking device and anything inside it do cast a pale shadow. And the device works only for microwaves, not for visible light or any other kind of electromagnetic radiation. So, Harry Potter's invisibility cloak doesn't have any real competition yet.—C. Gramling

Invisibility Ring
Invisibility Ring








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