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Flush-Free Fertilizer
Watching out for vultures
Amphibians
Tree Frogs
Frogs and Toads
Bullfrogs
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The Littlest Lemurs
Not Slippery When Wet
Little Bee Brains That Could
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Pollution at the ends of the Earth
Seeing red means danger ahead
Making light of sleep
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Sugary Survival Skill
Silk’s superpowers
A Framework for Growing Bone
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The solar system's biggest junkyard
Nonstop Robot
It's a Small E-mail World After All
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Fingerprinting Fossils
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Early Birds Ready to Rumble
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E Learning in Jamaica WIN PRIZES and try our Fun Animated Games
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
2014 GSAT Results for Jamaican Kids
Earth
Farms sprout in cities
Weird, new ant
A Volcano's Deadly Ash
Environment
Easy Ways to Conserve Water
Ready, unplug, drive
An Ocean View's Downside
Finding the Past
A Long Haul
A Human Migration Fueled by Dung?
A Big Discovery about Little People
Fish
Trout
Nurse Sharks
Goldfish
Food and Nutrition
In Search of the Perfect French Fry
A Pepper Part that Burns Fat
Moving Good Fats from Fish to Mice
GSAT English Rules
Subject and Verb Agreement
Pronouns
Whoever vs. Whomever
GSAT Exam Preparation Jamaica
The Annual GSAT Scholarships
How are students placed after passing the GSAT exam
42,000 students will sit for the GSAT Exam in two weeks
GSAT Exams Jamaica Scholarships
GSAT Exam Preparation
Results of GSAT are in schools this week
Access denied - Disabled boy aces GSAT
GSAT Mathematics
Losing with Heads or Tails
Secrets of an Ancient Computer
Monkeys Count
Human Body
Hear, Hear
Teen Brains, Under Construction
Taste Messenger
Invertebrates
Krill
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Butterflies
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Jaguars
Lhasa Apsos
Elephants
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What Not to Say to Emerging Readers
Choosing a Preschool: What to Consider
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Spin, Splat, and Scramble
IceCube Science
Invisibility Ring
Plants
City Trees Beat Country Trees
A Change in Leaf Color
Surprise Visitor
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Snakes
Snapping Turtles
Space and Astronomy
A Family in Space
Return to Space
A Star's Belt of Dust and Rocks
Technology and Engineering
Slip Sliming Away
Weaving with Light
Drawing Energy out of Wastewater
The Parts of Speech
What is a Verb?
Problems with Prepositions
What is a Preposition?
Transportation
Middle school science adventures
Are Propellers Fin-ished?
Robots on a Rocky Road
Weather
Catching Some Rays
Weekend Weather Really Is Different
Polar Ice Feels the Heat
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Insects

The largest and most diverse animals on earth, insects encompass over 925,000 different species. Found worldwide, in almost any climent and habitat, they share the common characteristics of a having an invertebrate (spineless) body divided into three parts (head, thorax and abdomen), with six legs, and a hard outer covering called an exoskeleton. They range in size from less than a millimeter to over 18 centimeters, and come in an endless variety of shapes and colors. Some insects include beetles, bees and wasps, flies, butterflies and moths. Insects are invertebrates in a class referred to Insecta. They are the most numerous and most widespread arthropods. Insects are the most diverse group of animals on the earth, with around 925,000 species described—more than all other animal groups combined: Insects may be found in nearly all environments on the planet, although only a small number of species have adapted to life in the oceans, where crustaceans tend to predominate. There are approximately 5,000 dragonfly species, 2,000 praying mantis, 20,000 grasshopper, 170,000 butterfly and moth, 120,000 fly, 82,000 true bug, 350,000 beetle, and 110,000 bee and ant species described to date. Estimates of the total number of current species, including those not yet known to science, range from two to thirty million, with most authorities favoring a figure midway between these extremes. The study of insects is called entomology.

Insects
Insects








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